THE WEEK IN CHESS 77			07/04/96	Mark Crowther
---------------------------------------------------------------------

1) Introduction
2) 10th VSB TOURNAMENT
3) Chess in the Schools International New York
4) New York Open. Newark
5) Polish Championships, Brzeg Dolny
6) Cannes Chess Festival
7) German Team Cup by Wolfgang Haar
8) 4NCL Round 8 results 17th March
9) Groningen Chess Club Weekend Tournament by Anjo Anjewierden
10) Danish Championships 1996
11) Yugometal Tournament Belgrade. Final Scores
12) AEGON Tournament
13) LATEST FIDE Developments
14) Costa Rican National Chess Championships by Rodolfo Arias
15) PCA "Kremlin Stars-96" INVITATION
16) Internation Chess Open Doctor. Geraldo J. R. Alckmin
17) Rustavi Chess School

GAMES SECTION
-------------

TWIC77.PGN

VSB  Amsterdam						 45 games
Chess in the Schools International			 66 games
Bundesliga Cup games					  4 games
Tournament of the Generations Cannes			 50 games
New York Open Newark					 44 games
New York Open G/60 timerates				  8 games

TWIC77EX.PGN

Polish Championships					120 games
Polish Women's Championships				 91 games
Danish National Championships				 35 games
Groningen Chess Club Tournament				 55 games

TWIC77CA.PGN

Cannes open						364 games

Extra Sections available via ftp and from my www:

These extra sections are available at:

Pittsburgh ftp site. (ftp.pitt.edu, group/chess/NEWS)
(probably Monday)

and straight away at my www site -
http://www.brad.ac.uk/~mdcrowth/chess.html

(note this is tilda mdcrowth, some terminals display this
as a percent sign which won't work)

1) Introduction
---------------

My thanks to Jouke Algra (whose excellent daily reports from Amsterdam helped
me out immeasurably), Eric Schiller, Vadim Kaminsky and Compuserve, Gabriel Sanchez,
Dr. Andrzej Polozowski and Piotr Kaczorowski, Christophe Bouton, Wolfgang Haar,
Anjo Anjewierden, Ian and Cathy Rogers, Per Rasmussen (Under Uret), Sinisa Joksic, TASC,
Patrick Rasenberg, and  Rodolfo Arias. Again I hope thats everyone.

One of the disadvantages in taking a week off is that you come back to
tonnes of work! Half a meg all told of games plus much to write about the
VSB tournament and then a large quantity of other material. Michael
Adams` performance at the Chess in the Schools International is an
excellent example of what he is capable of if he doesn't lose in the
early rounds!

Finally I will get round to working on my www page, I have probably 20-25
links to change when I get the chance.

Hope the extra week makes this issue worth waiting for!

Mark


2) 10th VSB TOURNAMENT
-----------------------

Round 1 (1996.03.22)

Topalov, Veselin   - Kasparov, Gary      1-0   66
Kramnik, Vladimir  - Seirawan, Yasser    1-0   32
Lautier, Joel      - Short, Nigel D      1-0   38
Gelfand, Boris     - Anand, Viswanathan  1/2   52
Timman, Jan H      - Piket, Jeroen       1/2   57

Round 2 (1996.03.23)

Short, Nigel D     - Gelfand, Boris      1-0   44
Anand, Viswanathan - Topalov, Veselin    0-1   51
Seirawan, Yasser   - Lautier, Joel       1-0   29
Piket, Jeroen      - Kasparov, Gary      0-1   39
Timman, Jan H      - Kramnik, Vladimir   1/2   43

Round 3 (1996.03.24)

Topalov, Veselin   - Short, Nigel D      0-1   46
Kasparov, Gary     - Anand, Viswanathan  1-0   36
Kramnik, Vladimir  - Piket, Jeroen       1/2   19
Lautier, Joel      - Timman, Jan H       1-0   42
Gelfand, Boris     - Seirawan, Yasser    1-0  109

Round 4 (1996.03.26)

Short, Nigel D     - Kasparov, Gary      1/2   43
Kramnik, Vladimir  - Lautier, Joel       1/2   22
Seirawan, Yasser   - Topalov, Veselin    1/2   42
Piket, Jeroen      - Anand, Viswanathan  1/2   19
Timman, Jan H      - Gelfand, Boris      1/2   23

Round 5 (1996.03.27)

Topalov, Veselin   - Timman, Jan H       1-0   32
Kasparov, Gary     - Seirawan, Yasser    1-0   34
Anand, Viswanathan - Short, Nigel D      1-0   45
Lautier, Joel      - Piket, Jeroen       0-1   25
Gelfand, Boris     - Kramnik, Vladimir   1/2   33

Round 6 (1996.03.28)

Kramnik, Vladimir  - Topalov, Veselin    1-0   36
Lautier, Joel      - Gelfand, Boris      1-0   32
Seirawan, Yasser   - Anand, Viswanathan  1/2   35
Piket, Jeroen      - Short, Nigel D      1/2   50
Timman, Jan H      - Kasparov, Gary      1/2   45

Round 7 (1996.03.30)

Topalov, Veselin   - Lautier, Joel       1-0   43
Kasparov, Gary     - Kramnik, Vladimir   1-0   43
Short, Nigel D     - Seirawan, Yasser    1/2   31
Anand, Viswanathan - Timman, Jan H       1-0   47
Gelfand, Boris     - Piket, Jeroen       1-0   31

Round 8 (1996.03.31)

Kramnik, Vladimir  - Anand, Viswanathan  0-1  108
Lautier, Joel      - Kasparov, Gary      1/2   27
Gelfand, Boris     - Topalov, Veselin    0-1   59
Piket, Jeroen      - Seirawan, Yasser    0-1   73
Timman, Jan H      - Short, Nigel D      0-1   56

Round 9 (1996.04.01)

Topalov, Veselin   - Piket, Jeroen       1-0   58
Kasparov, Gary     - Gelfand, Boris      1-0   36
Short, Nigel D     - Kramnik, Vladimir   1/2   14
Anand, Viswanathan - Lautier, Joel       1/2   29
Seirawan, Yasser   - Timman, Jan H       1/2   18

The table below was constructed using Sonneborn-Berger as tie-break.
I am unsure what method the organisers will use for their final table.

Amsterdam NED (NED), III 1996.                  cat. XVIII (2679)
-----------------------------------------------------------------
                                   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0
-----------------------------------------------------------------
 1 Topalov, Veselin    g BUL 2700  * 1 0 1 0 1 = 1 1 1  6.5  2842
 2 Kasparov, Gary      g RUS 2775  0 * = 1 1 = 1 1 1 =  6.5  2834
 3 Short, Nigel D      g ENG 2665  1 = * 0 = 0 = 1 = 1  5.0  2723
 4 Anand, Viswanathan  g IND 2725  0 0 1 * 1 = = = = 1  5.0  2716
 5 Kramnik, Vladimir   g RUS 2775  1 0 = 0 * = 1 = = =  4.5  2668
 6 Lautier, Joel       g FRA 2630  0 = 1 = = * 0 1 0 1  4.5  2684
 7 Seirawan, Yasser    g USA 2630  = 0 = = 0 1 * 0 1 =  4.0  2641
 8 Gelfand, Boris      g BLR 2700  0 0 0 = = 0 1 * 1 =  3.5  2596
 9 Piket, Jeroen       g NED 2570  0 0 = = = 1 0 0 * =  3.0  2566
10 Timman, Jan H       g NED 2620  0 = 0 0 = 0 = = = *  2.5  2519
-----------------------------------------------------------------

VSB by Jouke Algra
------------------

Kasparov crushed by Topalov at the start of VSB-Match Amsterdam.
----------------------------------------------------------------

Today the annual VSB chessmatch got started in Amsterdam, for the tenth
and also last time. The sponsor, a banking concern, wants to focus their
attention on some other sports. This might have to do something with the
negative press on chess lately, though the chief of the organising
committee, Van de Beek, denied this. Nevertheless in his opening speech he
warned the international chess world to be very careful in its actions in
the future, and try to get out of the mess they're in, because otherwise
companies might not want to put money into chess anymore. Obviously the
decision by the FIDE to organise their world championship in Iraq has
caused a lot of disapproval amongst potential sponsors.

Since it is the last time that VSB organises the tournament, they have done
their utmost best to get a very strong field of players together. They
definitely succeeded in that. With Kasparov, Kramnik, Timman, Piket,
Lautier, Anand, Topalov, Short, Seirawan and Gelfand the tournament
is category 18, something which has not been seen much in Holland
before. Gelfand was the last one to get invited, as a replacement for
Ivanchuk, who was supposed to come, but in the end didn't agree with the
money.

Topalov-Kasparov

A lot of people were very curious about Kasparov's play after his match
against IBM's supercomputer DEEP-BLUE. During that match he was
complaining about it being unfair that a computer never has to get up to
drink something or to go to the toilet. Playing a human today didn't
equalise that, since he had to play Topalov; a player with tremendous
concentration, who also never gets up during a game, but just sits there,
staring at the board with his fingers stuck in his ears.  Evidently it
helped. Within a few minutes the board was on flames. Kasparov chose a
rarely played variation of the Najdorf-Sicilian ( 9.....- Nc5xe4), which
is known as being risky and not very sound. A strange choice since he had
been in trouble before using this line, against a couple of Spanish
players in a television match a year ago. Topalov chose a very active and
tactical continuation, which proved to be very dangerous for black.
Especially his Kings knight played a remarkable role, going from g1 to f3
to d4 to c6 to d8 to f7 to g5 to finally capture black's queen on f7.
During all this it was hanging a couple of times without being taken. It
looked like Kasparov had overlooked the move 17. Nc6-d8. He started shaking
his head in the way we're used to whenever he has made a mistake.
Only five moves later he gave his queen to parry all the white threats.
From that point on Kasparov tried to stay alive as long as possible, but
with a very steady and secure techinique Topalov brouhgt the game to an
inescapeable result : 1 - 0 !

Kramnik-Seirawan

Another serious candidate for the tournament-victory is Kramnik, the young
player who was leading the ELO-ratinglist at the start of this year. In the
first round he had to play the American Seirawan, one of the "weaker"
players in this tournament. This game also saw a very rarely played
variation, the Nimzowitsch-Sicilian. Seirawan afterwards said he chose to
play this because he didn't want Kramnik to get into some "normal"
queens-pawn opening. Black got a solid position, but didn't play actively
enough when needed. According to Kramnik it would have been better for
black to play 10. ... e7-e5 11. Qd4-d3  Qd8-c7 instead of the passive
10. ... e7-e6. Kramnik came up with an original knight-manoeuvre at move
seventeen. Seirawan saw to late that his planned reaction 17. ... bxa3
18 b4 - Qa4 fails to 19 Rb1 !  and there is no defense against the double
threat of bxc5 and Nc3! (traps the queen). So he gave up the exchange and
hoped for a stubborn resistance but discovered to his horror that there
were more tactical tricks that couldn't be escaped. He resigned on move
32. Kramnik now has an ideal starting position compared to Kasparov.

Timman-Piket

For Dutch spectators this was an interesting clash between the two
strongest Dutch grandmasters. Timman has been the leading chessplayer in
Holland for many years and Piket is the strongest of the upcoming
generation, and even was a top-ten player for a while over a year ago.
Since then Piket has lost a lot of rating-points, playing bad tournaments.
Nevertheless he is still a dangerous opponent for anyone, especially
with the white pieces. Today he had black and played the Sicilian.
His position looked slightly worse throughout the game, and in
time-trouble a lot of people expected him to fall. Surprisingly it was
Timman who had to be careful in the end. He was a pawn up, but Piket's
rook and kingside pawns got pretty annoying. Finally the game was drawn
by move-repetition.

Lautier-Short

"In timetrouble your brain works in a different way" said Short, briefly
after his game. In a very exciting and tactical queens-indian game, he
relied on some unsound tricks in the end, which were easily dealt with by
the young Frenchmen Joel Lautier. The winner of last years edition (when
he beat Kasparov), will be very pleased with this good start.

Gelfand-Anand

This game was very complicated and positional from the start. Gelfand,
with white soon had a small plus having more active pieces, but didn't
show any real aggression. Anand did, as he started an opportunistic
pawn-storm on the kingside. Gelfand managed to block the pawns, and could
have taken over the initiative with 30. d5! but, being in time-trouble,
overlooked this move. Twenty moves later both players thought they had the
better position, but estimated their superiority not big enough to keep on
fighting: draw.

Topalov takes the lead in VSB-Tournament
----------------------------------------

On the second day of the VSB chesstournament, attention was mainly focused
on the two Dutchmen Timman and Piket, playing against the two leading
grandmasters in the world, Kramnik and Kasparov. There was a surprising
similarity between the two games: both Dutch players had white, both
followed some old lines of chess-theory, and they both got into trouble. The
only difference was the outcome of the games.

Piket - Kasparov

Jeroen Piket must have been a cautious man today. It is well known that
Kasparov usually hits back hard after losing a game (one only has to
remember the recent Kasparov-Anand title-match, to know what I mean). To
avoid Kasparov's opening preparation, Piket chose a nowadays rarely
played line of the Kings Indian Samisch System, that used to be popular
back in the sixties, With an early pawn move to g4 on move 11. Kasparov
reacted with the familiar move h5, an idea of Gligoric, which is regarded
as the equalizing move. Until move 14 they followed a game between
Kramnik and Nijboer, played in Groningen 1991. That game continued 14. Ng3
- Nh7 15 gxh - Nxg5 16 Qxg5 - Bf6 17 Qh6 - Bg7 18 Qg5 - Bf6 and the game
was drawn by repetition. Piket chose to trade the queens with the
move Nd1.  According to Piket he was too optimistic only three moves later
when he took the pawn on h5. Kasparov sacrificed a pawn and after the nice
knightmove 19....Nb7 he thought that black had a winning position.

Indeed all black's pieces coordinate very well together and become active,
whereas white's pieces have trouble finding the right squares and the
rooks don't get into play at all. When finally both players got into
timetrouble, everybody hoped that Piket would manage to escape,
especially when Kasparov started shaking his head as if he had made a
mistake and Piket could check him with 35. Rc7+ . After a few more checks
Piket played Nd6, which looked quite dangerous for black at the moment,
but unfortunately one move later Piket's flag fell and his game was lost
on time. Analysing the game afterwards, Kasparov found the right way to
escape the white threats, but Piket thought that he might have had a
better chance if he had chosen the move 38. a2-a4 instead of Nd6.

Timman-Kramnik

This game saw an even older line of theory, that Timman might have picked
up in his youth, studying games of Botwinnik and Keres. Via a reversed
move-order they reached a Caro-Kann position in which Timman pushed a pawn
to c5 on the eight move. Kramnik quite easily managed to get a solid
position, in which he could put pressure on white's pawns on b3 and d4.
As a counter-measure Timman launched a kingside-attack with his pawns, but
hesitated on pushing them through. On move 25 g5 would have been better than
the slow Kg2. This gave Kramnik a chance to sacrifice and decide the
game. Fortunately for Timman, Kramnik didn't play the best moves from then
on.Instead of 26.Bxd4 the move Qxc5 propably would have been a killer,
when the bishop stays on the board, being able to support the a-pawn.
Kramnik afterwards said that he had overlook 29.Nd2, which defends all
blacks major threats. But even after trading the bishop Kramnik propably
would have won if he had played 29......-Qc2!. After trading the queens on
e3 Timman managed to get a draw on move 39.

Short-Gelfand

In a Najdorf-Sicilian Short got a nice attack going on the kingside,
harrassing the black position whit his queen and a rook. Gelfand had to
give up a pawn, and hoped to get an attack against the exposed white king,
but only a few moves later he lost another pawn. Short had no problem
winning the resulting position, and thereby got his revenge for his loss
against Lautier yesterday.

Anand - Topalov

A very interesting game was played by these two strong players. In a
Sicilian game all the knights were exchanged within sixteen moves, which
resulted in a double-edged,open position, with opposite castling. Topalov
afterwards said that white might have a better position after 10.g4
instead of Qe2. Winning a pawn with 10...Nxd4 11.Qxd4 Nxg4 12 Bxg4 Bxg4
is very dangerous after 13.Nd5! and white gets an overwhelming attack.
Anand's position got in trouble after 25.g5, aimed at creating
complications. According to Topalov he'd better have tried 25. b3 after
which white's position might last a bit longer. Topalov created a passed
pawn on the f-file , which was supported by the centally placed queen on
e3. When Anand finally managed to force a queentrade, it was already to
late: black's kingside pawns could only be stopped by giving up a piece, and,
realising this, Anand resigned.

Seirawan - Lautier

Just like yesterday, Seirawan was the first to finish his game, with the
big difference that today he won. Lautier started an early kingside-attack
with his pieces, but forgot about the threats on his queenside, where
Seirawan soon managed to create a passed pawn. When Lautier realized the
danger he was in, it was already too late, and he resigned on move 29.

Five people take the lead at VSB-tournament, drama for Seirawan

A big crowd had gathered today at the VSB-banking building, to see their
chess-idols struggle, and they got what they came for; very intense and
fierce fights between some of the best chessplayers in the world. Just
like the first two rounds, hardly any g ame ended in a draw. Especially
Gelfand and Seirawan showed some real fighting spirit. It took 7 hours and
109 moves before the game dramatically ended in a loss for Seirawan, who
celebrated his 36 th birthday today.

Topalov - Short

"The Najdorf is just about alive!" said Nigel Short, briefly after winning
against Topalov, the Bulgarian who won his first two games. To everybody's
surprise Short chose the same, much criticized, Najdorf-Sicilian setup as
Kasparov did against Topalov in the first round. Kasparov got beaten
severely, but Short had found an improvement on black's play. He instantly
pushed the pawn to d5 on move twelve. Short : " This is much better than
Kasparov's Qe7, which is quite awful". Topalov played very straightforward
and very soon sacrificed the quality with Rxd4, after which his attack
seemed to be very dangerous for black. Short though knew what he was
getting in to: "I analyzed this rook-sacrifice a couple of years ago, when
preparing for my match against Kasparov. I then decided never to use this
line as white, since the position is unclear, it's very hard for white to
prove any real compensation for the exchange.". Topalov afterwards thought
that the sacrifice was at least good enough for a draw: "Maybe I had
better play 18.Qf3 instead of Bc5. Anyway, I always seem to lose my game
before we have a day off. It's so strange."  Short defended brilliantly
with the move 20....Bd7!. According to Short it was propably won for him
after this move. Topalov: " After 20 Rxd5 I thought that he was forced to
play 20... Re1+ 21. Kf2  Qe8 22 Qxe8  Rxe8 and then 23 Bb6 and all black`s
pieces are blocked and white is better".  After Bd7 white cannot take
advantage of the pin on the queen: 21 Qf7 Qa5! with mating threats, 21 Qd1
Qc8! attacks Bc5 and f5.  On move 23 Short had an easier win
with Qc8! but simply overlooked this possibility. His move Be8 didn't
spoil anything, though he had to fight on for 20 more moves before his
queenside pawns decided the game.

Lautier - Timman

Another mind-boggling game took place between Joel Lautier and Jan Timman.
In a Queens-Indian type game Lautier castled queenside and sacrificed the
rook for a bishop. Lautie's own bishops soon became very strong whereas
Timman had difficulties activating his rooks. In timetrouble black chose
to complicate matters with a funny knight's tour, which was reminiscent of
Topalov's knight against Kasparov. Unfortunately for Jan it didn't work
out right. Timman: "The knight move to f5 was wrong, maybe I should have
played Qe7 or Rfd8. I had overlooked 24 f4! which protects the pawn and
gives him a tempo after Be5". The complications favoured Lautier, who
ended up with two beautiful connected passed pawns in the centre, which
were unstoppable. Timman resigned on m ove 42.

Kramnik - Piket

The other Dutch player, Jeroen Piket, soon managed to get an even game,
playing a King's Indian with black against Kramnik. In a position that is
not completely clear, Kramnik offered the draw, which Piket accepted
without hesitating.

Kasparov - Anand

Also Garry and Vishy seemed to be heading towards a quick draw. A very
closed and unclear position arose, Kasparov using the same old Caro-Kann
line that Timman had used a day before. "I don't understand this position"
commenter Sosonko said, "You really have to get into it, this is about
some very high level positional ideas ". When both players started
repeating moves, the audience feared the worse. The contrary happened
though. The b-file was opened and Kasparov could invade with a rook.
Having used a lot of time for his first 20 moves, Kasparov came in
timetrouble. In a highly complicated and tactical position, he had to make
over 10 moves in 5 minutes. He managed to do so and even won a few pawns
on the kingside, maintaining a devestating pin on blac k's knight. Not
much later he traded all the pieces, being left with an easily won
pawn-ending, whereupon Anand resigned. Clearly Anand is not playing very
well here in Amsterdam, only having scored half a point so far. Anand: "I
don't know what is wrong with me. I see all the positional things very
fine, but today I didn't see the tactics, I didn't see Kasparov's attack
coming, could not imagine he could come up with such an invasion so fast."

Gelfand - Seirawan

Longest, strangest and most dramatic game of the day was played between
Gelfand and Seirawan, who hoped for a nice win on his 36th birthday. No one
could have expected the things to happen to him on this day.  In a typical
Nimzo-Indian position, Gelfand first tried to push e4, and when this
didn't succeed , he launched a kingside attack with g4. This at first
worked out fine for Gelfand, winning a pawn, but in time trouble Seirawan
won back two pawns with some nice tricks. Still, the position was very
tough, Seirawan having a small plus. They kept on playing, until finally
the building was almost completely deserted, at this rainy sunday evening
8.30 p.m. , only observed by Gelfand's wife, arbiter Geurt Gijssen, and
two spectators. Pressure almost gets unbearable as the seconds tick away.
Seirawan is one pawn up, and he knows that there must be a win somewhere,
but where, he doesn't see it right away. He exchances rooks on move 69,
hoping to convert his extra pawn into a queen (it looks like Re1 is
better than exchanging, aiming for Rc1 Rxc3). Still it looks very
difficult. A computer would immediately pick the right move to play, but
for a human all this calculating takes a lot of time. He has to count all
the moves of his king, of his pawns, and the bishop. Finally they both
have less than 5 minutes to end the game, there is no possibility of
adjourning. Here are two men tormenting their brains; one trying to
squeeze out a victory on his birthday, the other trying to stay alive.
Then Seirawan starts the final attack, pushes his b-pawn, paving the path
for the a-pawn. Both players bend over the board, hands and pieces flying
through the air. Gelfand has 3 minutes left, Seirawan only one. Black and
white pawns are marching up to their beloved eight row, where they know
they become queens. Seirawan's legs are trembling, wild and uncontrolled.
Arbiter Geurts Gijssen is sitting next to the board, carefully watching
the men play. Then all of a sudden he bends towards the board , because
he thinks he sees an illegal move by Seirawan. On his turn Seirawan, who
is completely absorbed by the game, is startled by this movement , breaks
out of his hypnosis and blunders away his queen...  Seirawan protests
loudly, says he though that Gijssen pointed at the flag, and asks for his
last moves to be undone. Gijssen agrees, the moves are taken back, but
within three seconds Seirawan's flag falls, just before he can complete a
drawing move. Still Seirawan is protesting, saying it's unfair to play on
in such a drawn ending, but Gelfand doesn't agree and shows some lines in
which black could make a mistake and lose. Gijssen cannot help Seirawan
either. The American gets an 0. Almost in tears he leaves the building
right away.

All games drawn, Kasparov nearly defeated by Short
--------------------------------------------------

After having had a day off, results today were quite dissappointing. All
games ended in a draw, while in the first three rounds only a total of 4
draws could be noted. Maybe the very early draw (after only 19 moves)
between Piket and Anand, was contagious . Nobody expected though, the
fight between Short and Kasparov to end in a draw. These players created a
game that still needs a lot of analysis, but already has shown a lot of
its beauty.

Short - Kasparov

A couple of the world's strongest grandmasters of a past generation
visited the VSB tournament today, like Hort, Ljubojevic and Ulf Andersson.
Their attention was drawn almost exclusively to the wild and controversial
Kasparov game. Black defended with t he Najdorf-Sicilian, against which
Short chose to attack with the Fischer System with Bc4. Soon Kasparov
played a new and unexpected move, 13....-Ne8 , which was condemned by all
the observing grandmasters. Hort: " This doesn't look good, the knight has
n o real future on e8. But Kasparov usually knows what he's doing, he must
have his reasons". But things got worse for Kasparov, the knight
obstructed the development of his other pieces, and Short got a very good
position, facing black with some very concr ete threats. Kasparov had to
play g6 and moved the knight to g7, where it even looked being positioned
worse. A few moves later everybody thought Short was definitely winning.
Unfortunately he didn't play 27. gxh5! after which Kasparov later said, he
pro pably would have resigned. On 27...- Nxh5 white might play 28 Rxf7!
Rxf7 29 Rxf7 Kxf7 30 Qxg6+ Kf8 31 Qh6+ Ng7 32 Bg6 and soon black will be
mated, or 27....-Nf5 28 hxg6 fxg6 29 Bb3! and white has a won position.
Only 4 moves after missing this winning continuation, Short was faced with
a sacrifice he didn't see coming: "Nxc3 was a total shock to me".  With
some great tactics, Kasparov managed to change his lost position into
almost a won one.  Short wisely chose to save at least the draw with a
move-repetition.  Afterwards the game was fought all over again, this time
at least fifteen grandmasters facing eachother. They found that black
might even had a won position, had he played 35....-Qd8, when white seems
hardly able to escape all the threats to his exposed k ing and terribly
placed bishop on a8. Finally Ljubojevic came up with a drawing
continuation against an unleashed Kasparov. Still there's a lot of
analysis to be expected on this position...

Timman - Gelfand

Timman chose a strange opening system today playing Bg5 on move two.
Gelfand easily got an even position, in which both players didn't have to
fear anything. When almost all pieces had left the board, they agreed on a
draw.

Piket - Anand

These two players really made a spiritless impression today. Soon they
reached a familiar position of the QueensIndian defense. After trading
some pieces on e4, Piket might have chosen to fight on a bit, but he
agreed on Anand's draw-offer.

Kramnik - Lautier

Much more interesting was the fight between Kramnik and Lautier.  In a
Queensgambit Accepted, Kramnik came up with the strangelooking move 12
Ra2, which surprised everybody. It turned out not to be such a bad move
though, and soon he seemed to have the b est of the game. But on move 20
Lautier found the right way not to lose a piece and two moves later they
agreed on a draw.

Seirawan - Topalov

Also nice and tactically was the game between Topalov, who is playing very
well in Amsterdam, and Seirawan, who had such a deception two days ago.
Playing a Nimzo-Indian , Topalov managed to get pressure on white's
queenside. Seirawan chose to give a pawn , and counterattacked in the
centre.Play became rather complicated, but both players made no mistakes,
and ended up in an equal position. The fifth draw of today was a fact.

Amazing games at VSB-tournament; Kasaparov and Topalov lead

For lovers of astounding sacrifices and wild complications (aren't we all?!),
today was definitely the best round at the VSB chesstournament in Amsterdam.
Maybe the beatiful weather inspired them, or the extra day off some players
granted themselves yesterday (5 draws) may have given some special energy.
Anyway, in nothing less then three games there were players sacrificing
pieces and exchanges, which in all three cases worked. Again it was Kasparov's
game that drew most attention, but also Jeroen Piket's fabulous win over Lautier
was acclaimed.

Kasparov - Seirawan

In a QueensGambit Accepted, Seirawan soon got an equal position.
On move ten he played Ng4 , thinking he is threatening knight takes
f2. To his surprise Kasparov doesn't defend the bishop on c4 with
for example 11.Qe2, to stop the combination with Nxf2,

but no, Kasparov almost forces him to take , with the move h3.
Afterwards Seirawan said that it was too tempting and he took
(probably Nge5 would have been better, with a slight edge for black).
Seirawan in fact wins a quality and a pawn, but Kasparov has
seen that after 14.Qg3, black has a very difficult task of defending
his position. Due to the weakness of the black squares, black can hardly
find a decent move, and plays f6. For a while it looks as if Seirawan
can defend, but all white pieces get great activity and attack the king
which is caught in the centre. Kasparov afterwards thought that black
would have a better defense in 21....-Nf8, but this move looks quite
artificial and still black is in trouble. Kasparov really plays the
attack brilliantly, and on move 32  Seirawan resignes, since he will
be mated in a few moves. This game really showed Kasparov at its best!

Lautier - Piket

Also Piket created a very nice attack in his game against Lautier, which
was preceeded by the sacrifice of first a quality and then a piece. Piket
had black, and defended with the Nimzo-Indian. Soon almost all queenside
and centre pawns were gone, and pla y was very open. On move 18 Piket
surprisingly took the pawn on b4 with his queen, which meant sacrificing
his rook on f8.  Jeroen didn't care and found a beautiful second sacrifice
on move 21, taking on f2 with the knight, destroying whites position, whi
ch comes under attack of all his pieces. If white would have taken with
the king, then a second rook sacrifice would have won the game for Piket
with Rxc4 Qxc4 and Qb2! and white loses a lot of material. On move 25
Lautier resigned, in a funny position, i n which his queen, rook and
bishop are attacked at the same time...

Topalov - Timman

Topalov was the third to sacrifice a piece and win. In a Advance Caro-Kann
position, white tore apart black's kingside with 17.Lxh6. The intermediate
exchange of black's bishop on f3 only made things worse. It was clear
Timman couldn't resist Topalov's at tack. The Bulgarian found a nice
finishing combination which ended all black's hope for survival.

Gelfand - Kramnik

In an English opening Gelfand got the better of the game, especially after
the strong move 14.b4!. Black doesn't have any real satisfactory answer,
and stays under pressure throughout the game. Kramnik is a stubborn
defender though, who finds all the righ t moves. His position has been
slightly worse constantly, but he manages to stay alive and get away with
a draw after 33 moves.

Anand - Short

In this game Short chose a rather strange Sicilian setup, with a6 and g6.
For the first time in this tournament, Anand came up with some real
aggressive moves. He tried to kill the slow Dragon setup with an early g4,
and castled queenside. The position be came very unclear with both players
attacking. Short lost a pawn , but managed to win it back, but by then his
position had worsened. On move 41 Anand played the strong move c4. After
this Anand quickly wins, exploiting some weak moves of Short. On move 4 5
Short resigns. After 45....-Kh4 46 Rh6+ Kg3 47 Qd3+ black cannot go to g2
or f2 because it's mate in a few moves, and on Qf3 black loses to Rh3+!.

Kramnik and Kasparov leading at VSB-match

With only three rounds to go it is still unclear who is going to win the
tournament. A lot of people think it'll be Garry Kasparov, especially
after his beautiful win over Seirawan yesterday. But today the young
Kramnik joined the world-champion at the to p, winning against Topalov. In
the next round the two K's in this tournament meet, and the outcome of
that game might be decicive for the final result. Kramnik has shown a real
fighter's mentality this tournament and Kasparov's play isn't very steady.
Als o today he got in trouble against Jan Timman.

Timman - Kasparov

With white, Timman chose the same old Samisch line against Kasparov's
King's Indian, as Piket did in round 2. That game was won by Kasparov, but
Timman propably prepared an improvement on white's play. Anyhow, Garry
didn't want to test it, and deviated wi th 12.Nh7 instead of b5. Timman
castled queenside, and got a slightly better position, with pressure on
the opened g-line. All white and black's play concentrated on the
king-side, where Kasparov gave a pawn to create a bit more space and
exchange some pi eces. According to Kasparov, white's attack could have
been much more dangerous, had Timman played 20.Rdf1 when the pawnmove to
f4 will be much more threatening to black. But Timman played the slow Kb1,
and a few moves later queens were traded. Black man aged to grab the
initiative for a while, doubling his rooks on the c-file.  This looked
very dangerous for Timman, but he found all the right moves to defend. The
knight on d1 looks a bit misplaced, but in fact is a very strong defender,
and with the fine move 41.Tf5 he even gets the advantage again. White
threatens Rh5+ and after king moves, he can take on h4 since the bishop is
pinned. If black plays 41....-Nc5+, there can follow 42.Kb4 - Nxe4? 43.Rh4
Rh7 44.Rxh7 Kxh7 45. Bd3! and black's knight is lost . So Kasparov had to
move the king, after which Timman chose to draw with a move repetition.
Afterwards Kasparov pointed out that he was very glad this happened,
because he didn't see what to do when Timman would have played 42.Rg5 -
Kf6 43.Rg4! threaten ing Rf1, and the king comes under heavy attack of all
white's pieces.

Kramnik - Topalov

Everybody expected these two players to fight to death today, and that's
what happened. Topalov's play had made a big impression sofar, and Kramnik
had shown a lot of fighting spirits in his games. Very soon a kind of
Benoni position arises, when Topalov allows Kramnik to push the pawn to
d5. Kramnik plays very sharp with the move 13.f4, and gets a great
attacking position, but with 15....-f5 Topalov finds a great defense, and
the situation is unclear. Kramnik creates a doublepawn on the d-line, and
Topal ov gets in with his rook on e2, which looks dangerous. But after 31.
Qb5! white has everything under control again, and easily wins in 5 moves.

Piket - Short

In a QueensIndian game, Piket had a slight advantage. He even won a pawn
after almost 40 moves, but in the queen and rook ending, the extra pawn
was not enough to win. On move 50 they agreed on a draw.

Seirawan - Anand

This game was very slow and positional, without any real posibilities for
both players to get some play. After 35 moves all pieces were traded, and
the resulting pawn-ending was a dead draw.

Lautier- Gelfand

Gelfand used the Meran defense against white's queenpawn-opening, and
chose to castle queen-side. This turned out to be a very bad choice.
Lautier skillfull broke down black's pawnformation with a couple of
pawnsacrifices, and got all his pieces attaking down open lines and
diagonals. It was clear Gelfand couldn't resist such an attack, and with a
nice combination Lautier won, now sharing second place with Topalov.

10de VSB Schaaktoernooi
-----------------------

By Mark Crowther

7th round Saturday 30 March
-------------------------------

Gelfand-Piket           1-0
Topalov-Lautier         1-0
Kasparov-Kramnik        1-0
Anand-Timman            1-0
Short-Seirawan          1/2

Gelfand-Piket           1-0

Noteboom variation main line. Jeroen Piket risked this variaton
against Gelfand today. The key point appeared to be the 18. ..Nc5.
After the game Gelfand strongly suggested that 18. ...Qd6 was
better. Piket seemed at a loss as to why his game went down
hill after 18. ...Nc5 but he was brutely dispatched only a dozen
moves later.

Topalov-Lautier         1-0

A fluctuating game and unfortunately the postmortem was conducted
in Russian. Lautier provoked tactics with 22. ...f4 but his position
collapsed rapidly.

Kasparov-Kramnik        1-0

Probably Kasparov's best game for long time. The plan chosen
by Kramnik of a6 followed by 10. ...b5 was extremely unusual.
Kasparov thought for 35 minutes over 11. Bxf6 and was at that
point an hour behind on the clock. The suggestion after the
game was that Kramnik was close on busted after 20. f5 by Kasparov
and might have tried 19. ...f5 himself. If this proves to
be unsound then one would have to look earlier for the improvement.
The postmortem was conducted on the stage of the tournament.

Anand-Timman            1-0

After only 12 moves Timman already stood better.
This caused Anand to flee his castled position with his King.
Anand suggested that Timman's 19. ...h5 was inaccurate and that
perhaps Rg8 might be better. Also later it was thought that perhaps
Timman should have closed the Kingside with g3.
Timman's position further declined after the poor 26. ...Qe6.
Timman however launched a vicious attack on Anand's King
which probably should have been good enough to draw. It
looked very good although Anand claimed that after collecting
the material he was more or less winning. Timman certainly
didn't seem to make the most of his attacking chances and
lost. 44. Bxf4 was terminal.

Short-Seirawan          1/2

Short played the unusual 6. a3 which he played against a not
very well publicised match against Adianto earlier this year.
9. b3 was an interesting alternative to his incisive c4.
After Short's waited 10. Re1 h6 was excellent. Short built
some attacking chances. However Seirawan's idea of 18. ...Nc4
was the real turning point. Without this idea he was more or
less bust. After it he pressed for a win. This didn't arrive
and the game was drawn.

An excellent days play.

Black is OK at round eight; Topalov catches up with Kasparov.
-------------------------------------------------------------

Times are changing, even in chess. About 15 years ago it looked like the
game of chess was solved; if you just followed the right opening lines,
and didn't make any big mistakes, you would be able to force a draw on
your opponent. Nowadays grandmaster che ss seems to have changed quite
radically. Opening-play is much sharper, complications are not being
evaded and as a result much more games end in a win (or loss). Players
have come to realise that their market-value is not only in their rating,
but also i n their style of play and reputation. Of course modern
computerchess-programs and data-bases are a big help to chessplayers, to
find hidden moves (usually tactics) in games of the past, and to find out
what the best weapons are against colleagues.  The VSB-match in Amsterdam
has become a remarkable tournament, where this new style of
hyper-productive play is flourishing as never before. Every day we see
extremely sharp and complicated play, sacrifices and grandmasters fighting
till death. In the fir st seven rounds this lead to only 14 draws, 17 (!!)
wins for white, and 4 for black. Today it was time for black to do
something about this big difference. Four games were won with black, and
only one was drawn. Unfortunately for Kasparov he was the one t o draw,
which meant that Topalov, beating Gelfand, caught up with him.

Lautier - Kasparov

Lautier is one of the few players who has a positive score against
Kasparov. In last years edition of the VSB-match, he even beated Garry
with the black pieces, and won the tournament. Today he had white, and a
lot of people hoped for the same spectacular result as last year. Kasparov
played the KingsIndian, that turned into a Benoni after ten moves. Things
got exciting when Kasparov gave his h-pawn, which surprised everyone, and
it looked like Lautier got caught in one of Garry's feared
homepreperations.  Lautier wasn't impressed though and chose to attack
Kasparov whit his own weapons, sacrificing a full piece to create threats
against black's king. This looked so serious that Kasparov pulled the
emergency-break and countersacrificed his bishop. If the bishop would be
taken,black can play Qf4+ after which the queens get traded and black has
an advantage. Lautier didn't take though, but forced the draw with a
move-repetition.

[Lautier turned up 5 minutes late for the game and Kasparov 15.
evidently this is a kind of ritual! Who can arrive latest. MC]

Kramnik - Anand

While Kasparov's game took only 27 moves, all the others were at least
twice as long. Kramnik and Anand even had to conduct precisely four times
as much moves before the game was finished. At the start of the tournament
Anand was slightly complaining abou t his play, saying he was losing the
way when games got complicated and unclear. But the last few rounds he
seems to be playing like he used to; very clever and very fast. Kramnik
today needed a lot of time to solve all the problems Anand thought up for
h im. In a Sicilian game, Kramnik hardly got ahead, and when he started
feeling the pressure of the clock, Anand even made it worse for him with a
quality-sacrifice. A very unclear position arose, and for a long time it
was hard to assess who was better. An and had a much easier position
though, and found all the right moves very fast. On move 71 he launches a
decisive combination with h3. Kramnik fights for what he's worth, and
that's a lot, but not even he can squeeze a draw out of it, so he resigns
on mov e 108.

Piket - Seirawan

Too much agression today killed Piket. He had reached an even position
against Seirawan's Queens-Indian, but wanted more where there was no more.
Afterwards he said that 24.f5 was a move that worked as a boomerang,
opening up the position but giving chan ces to black. For a while it looks
like white is better, but after 29....-Qg5+, things are not so clear.
Seirawan:"I gave this check, because I had seen a perpetual, I though I
had to go for the draw. But when I looked longer at it, it occurred to me
tha t in fact it was a very strong move, and that I had to go for a win!"
Seirawan played the position very precise and won the endgame after 73
moves.

Timman - Short

Something is wrong with Timman's play lately, but it's hard to say
excactly what. It looks like he lacks the energy or the right state of
mind to kill his opponent. Today Short was a willing victim, who got
easily outplayed in the opening, the Sicilian-Ta imanov. Timman got a
gorgeous attacking position, but failed to finish it. He threw his cards
on the table much too soon, and overlooked or underestimated Shorts simple
defense. Timman's attack was over, but he skillfull fought on, being a
pawn down. Neve rtheless the loss was unavoidable, Short made no mistakes
and scored the point.

Gelfand - Topalov

In a very well-known line of the KingsIndian Defense, Topalov managed to
get a small advantage. He traded all the pieces, except for a knight and
the queen, and kept on pressing Gelfand's position.  White stayed alive
though and the game appeared to be a draw. But Gelfand made a sloppy move
with 46.h4. At first sight the moves looks logical, threatening h5, but it
gives black the opportunity to attack and win the pawn on g4. Topalov
found the nice sq uare c8 for his queen to do so, and after collecting the
pawn, Gelfand quickly got beaten. Now Topalov is leading again, together
with Kasparov. Probably all attention will be focused on these two players
tomorrow.

FINAL ROUND
-----------

Actually neither Jouke or myself (MC) got to see much of this round! There
was plenty to do in the press room. I had to leave at 5-30 and I spent that
in conversation with a lot of people who wanted to have a chat. Topalov
and Kasparov set their stalls out and both won in determined fashion. I
was introduced to Kramnik who still looked shell-shocked at losing to
Anand the previous evening. Gradually all the other games finished bar
those of the leaders, everyone started to unwind and the organiser could
see the end of ten years hard and appreciated work.

VSB Impressions by Mark Crowther
--------------------------------

Finally after 10 years I managed to get my act together enough to
visit one of my favourite tournaments, the VSB tournament in
Amsterdam. Unfortunately the ten years promised by VSB have
come to an end. Certainly the Tournament Director mw. GE Muller
who works for VSB and who has organised all ten events deserves
our gratitude.

I'd like to thank Ian and Cathy Rogers for making me so welcome
in Amsterdam and making my stay such an enjoyable one.

On Monday night I went with some English friends to one of the
Chess Bars in the Center of Amsterdam. I was challenged to a
game and then after a little while I and a friend played some
bughouse with a couple of Dutch Guys. After chucking out time
we went to another bar. An excellent evening!

Ljubo in Amsterdam for his Dutch League matches. He enlivened
things with his post match comments!

MC at the VSB
--------------

I arrived at the VSB mid-afternoon on the Wednesday. I had only
got a passport the previous week and was not really up to much!
It was a real pleasure to get away from work and everything
and although I didn't make the best of the visit to Amsterdam
I had a day just walking around trying to avoid getting run over
by the bikes on the rest day on Friday. Everyone was very friendly
and I took the opportunity to visit the Euwe Museum (Max Euwe Plein
just next to the Donner bridge!) in the morning. The centre has an
exhibition about Euwe's career and the World of chess, its history
and many wonderful photographs. When you visit you need to ring
a number of bells as you go through the doors into a business
block. The man who met me had heard of me and I had a pleasent
hour being shown around. The Centre has a collection of books
which is building all the time (the Royal Dutch Library has a
much larger one) and there are computers aswell as a card index
system of openings which contains many gems from pre-informant
times. The Centre also sells books and I picked up Kuiper's
books Hundert Jahre Schach Turniere 1851-1950 and Hundert Jahre
Schachzweikampfe a double volume which I found quite common in
Amsterdam but which I've never seen before. This book is a real
trivia addicts delight!

I have visited quite a few events in England since I got on the net
in early 1993 but this was the first event when almost everyone
had heard of me!

The Layout
----------

The tournament was played in one of the larger VSB Banks
in the flower market in Amsterdam. The main hall area
was normally their canteen. There were two rows of chessboards
running down the hall to the front where the demo boards
were. At the side were TVs which showed two of the games
each round from the side. The demo boards were updated in
the traditional manner by runners from the tournament area.

Each day there were two commentators. These included
Van der Wiel, Van Wijgerden, Ree, Ligterink, Sosonko,
Boersma, Hort (who worked the crowd very well, I think
he's done this before!) Jongsma and Hartoch. The room
took at least 250 people and was very well attended.

The play took place in a side room with probably space for
50 spectators.

The Pressroom was expertly run by J van den Berg. There
were cameras in one room above the analysis boards so that
even in the other "hospitality" room you could see the
players analyse.

I was "warned" about the hospitality! Delicious sandwiches,
beer, soft drinks, coffee, tea etc were on hand all day
so that we didn't have to miss any action.

In between the two rooms was the Dutch Teletext room where
live updates of three games were made. This was a very
good place to find out the latest news about the games.

I must thank Arvind Aaron who allowed me to use his computer
(otherwise I would have probably sent nothing whilst I was there.
He writes for his own magazine and also has a quarter page every day
for an Indian paper. Impressively organised as he sent photos back
to india every afternoon having got them processed and scanned in in
the City Centre and then using his laptop to send those files.

The Prizes
-----------

1st	f 25.000	 6th 	f 10,000
2nd	f 20,000	 7th	f  8,000
3rd	f 17,500	 8th	f  6,000
4th	f 15,000	 9th	f  4,000
5th	f 12,500	10th	f  2,000

Over the days I was there I saw Lobron, Dagobert Kohlmeyer
(Rochade) an editor of Schach from Germany, the editor of
Europe Echecs and I had the opportunity for a long conversation
with New in Chess editor Dirk Jan ten Geuzendam. I met so many
of the Dutch journalists including having a chat with Hans Ree.
Hort was around one day also and it was interesting to hear
his opinions on the days play. Dutch teletext is put together
by a great character. An interesting thing is that he didn't
realise that Dutch TT was on the net!

Malcolm Pein turned up for one days play and I was very shocked
to find that the latest issue of Chess has a rather large
picture of me in it! John Henderson makes some very kind remarks
about TWIC in the article too. (The photo was taken at the
PCA Rapid London leg last year)

Yuri Vassiliev a Russian Journalist for a sports paper was
there. He had news of yet another Kirsan press conference.
He told us via Ljubojevic that there was a press conference
in Moscow by the FIDE President. Words of wisdom included:

If Israel is so bothered about the match being in Iraq why
don't they organise the event? (ditto USA also)

There are already 10 cities (no names no pack drill) interested
enough to come up with $5m for the KO World Championships in
December.

Iraq owes Russia $10 billion which is something like 8 Kopecs
for every Rouble in circulation. Kirsan is trying to do something
about this. [at least I think this was the point being made]

Kasparov has his organisation and we have ours. When we sort
out FIDE's problems we will talk about reunification contests.

Kirsan is certain of success as he is a high powered businessman
who never breaks a promise! [So I imagine the Shepherds have
their mobile phones now.]

As this is the last event Dutch journalists were all talking about
the difficulties of finding sponsors for events. The publicity
is fantastic in the Netherlands but even they are starting to
find things hard. This year will be the last Donner Memorial
under the current sponsor, also the Dutch Championships will
see Timman play for the first time in many years. However what
about next year? All I can say is that through its connection
with chess (and especially having actually attended the event)
I can say that VSB is a watchword for excellence. However many
were very worried about the impact on sponsors of both the
PCA/FIDE split and especially over even considering holding a
match in Iraq.

Bits and bobs on the players
-----------------------------

Kramnik is back on the fags as Zoe, Gelfand's wife complained about him
borrowing hers!

Only a few players seemed to have seconds.
Joel Lautier has Matthew Sadler and Kasparov brought Yury Dokhoian.
It was very funny to see Yury's face in the pressroom after someone
commented that it was a shame that Kasparov had just won! (we had
monitors showing 2 of the 4 games.)

Lingustics
----------

Anand speaks English and Spanish.
Topalov speaks English, Russian and Spanish
Lautier speaks English and Russian.
Kramnik speaks at least some English [Lobron was kind enough
to introduce him to me after his brief draw in the last round.
His disaster in round 8 was still clearly hurting.]
Nigel Short's English accent becomes more bizarre every time
I hear it. Clearly too many hours analysing with Eastern
Europeans is taking its toll.
Ljubojevic seems to speak every language.
The Dutch all speak great English.


Kasparov
--------

All the time I was there Kasparov seemed in an excellent mood.
The three postmortems in the pressroom I saw were very relaxed
affairs. In fact I was almost shocked at his lack of assertiveness!
Against Yasser with white he stood worse after only a few moves.
He then played h3. This invited Yasser to retreat his knight
with his edge or to play more agressively with Nxf2. Kasparov's
judgement was that he definitely wasn't happy with the way the
opening went but that he would be more than happy to sac a
rook and a pawn to sort his position out! Yasser obliged with
Nxf2. Kasparov didn't know whether he should win or not but
the way the postmortem went it seemed to be very good. He
laughed at various points wiggling his hand in snake like
motions to indicate that all his remaining pieces ended up
pointed at Yasser's King. He did however seem to play the
variations in the post mortem rather than come up with things
he had seen in the game.

Kasparov was very happy to draw against Timman in the following
round. Timman had yet another miserable tournament. Here as
in other games he had a great (probably winning position) but
just couldn't prove it. In analysis Kasparov always wanted to
take the a3 pawn and get a past pawn. He got very excited
about the possibilities of just Queening urging the pawn home
even though not many of the lines seemed to work. Again good
humour, probably because he was pleased to draw.

It was quite disappointing that Kasparov and Kramnik (who were
the last to finish) analysed on stage. However the camera
in the press centre showed probably everything there was to
know about the mood of the post mortem. Kasparov and Kramnik
went through lines at lightening speed. A flurry of moves
would appear and they would exchange a couple of words and
then back again to the game. They seemed to be mostly on the
same wavelength.

The postmortem against Lautier again was a more serious affair
although conducted in Russian Kasparov aimed brief comments
in English. He did however ask his second if his opening was
all right!

The Russian part of the postmortem was mostly serious the
English comments humourous.

After one hair raising line he said "Fighting spirit!" laughing
and he just picked up the knight on e5 and said
"Key piece, no mate!" When he was pushing a pawn he seemed
to say "Zel, zel, zel" and at the end of the post mortem
he concluded with "Chess is a draw?" before adding that
he had a variation with Nh4 where white was exposed on both
sides of the board.

All in all I got the feeling that he was playing quite relaxed
chess and was quite pleased that everything was working out
more or less OK.

Topalov
-------

It was much harder to gain an impression of Topalov as he spoke
Russian in his postmortems. He does speak English however.
Lightening fast in analysis he and Gelfand swapped variations
at high speed. His concentration at the board seems total, he
doesn't wander about very much if at all. When he is concentrating
he sticks his fingers in his ears.

Short
-----

He seemed quite relaxed. He missed an easy win against Kasparov
in one of the earlier rounds but later was "probably just getting
mated" against Timman. However according to him his position looked
worse than it actually was (unless you are lost! said Timman).
Players were still discussing the kill and trying to back up
the "absolutely lost" assessment with variations several days later.
Short probably is getting mated, but it most certainly isn't easy.
In the end Short's counterplay arrived and Timman's position
went belly up. Short seemed relaxed and although he had some
dicey moments he also came very close to downing the big K.

Anand
-----

Anand's enthusiasm for the tournament was probably directly affected
by his 0/2 over the first weekend. He looked distinctly unenthusiastic
about his win against Short. His play was very strong but suffered
from many rather dodgy moments.

Kramnik
-------

When Kramnik hit the lead after beating Topalov in round 6 it
seemed that he was in the swing of things. However in round
7 he lost to an impressive Kasparov performance and then
totally had the stuffing knocked out of him by Anand. A
drawn ending turned to an extremely painful loss, he still
looked unhappy about it after his lightening fast draw against
Short in the final round.

Lautier
-------

Lautier was calm and correct throughout the tournament. There really
isn't much to say about him. A funny point was when the editor of
Europa Echecs turned up, he asked him for some annotations to one
of the games but was pretty anxious to have it happen away from
my eyes! (I would never have knicked the analysis but it would
have been fun to watch)

Seirawan
--------

Yasser seemed to be having a good time. I think he really enjoys
these trips to Europe to play the best. He had some pretty dicey
moments but was certainly good for his gained rating points. In
fact it could have been quite a bit better, especially if he
had avoided the loss to Gelfand.

Gelfand
-------

Gelfand struggled mightily throughout the event and probably would
have had a much better result if he hadn't completely misjudged
the ending against Topalov in round 8. I don't think it put him
in much of a mood to play Kasparov with Black in the final round.

Piket
-----

I didn't really see too much of Piket except on the first day
I was there. Seemed very pleasant.

Timman
-------

Its really sad to see Timman with his confidence so low. He had
numerous good positions but a combination of bad luck and probable
fatalism seemed to conspire against him. He has yet to win in
1996 according to some I talked to. He had great positions
against Kasparov and Short, but the killer blow was just not
there.

Dos Hermanas in Seville
-----------------------

It seems that politics aside there will be an even stronger event
this year. May 20th will see the following players in Seville.
Only Karpov is missing. I gather that Rustam will not be there.
It is good to see both Judit Polgar and Kamsky playing in the
same event as Kasparov. Now is definitely the time for players
to let their pieces do the talking.

1.  Kramnik, Vladimir 		g RUS 2730  31 25.06.75 M 2775 42
2.  Kasparov, Gary 		g RUS 2795  26 13.04.63 M 2775 19
4.  Ivanchuk, Vassily 		g UKR 2740  36 18.03.69 M 2735 39
5.  Kamsky, Gata 		g USA 2735  16 02.06.74 M 2735 0
6.  Anand, Viswanathan 		g IND 2725  10 11.12.69 M 2725 0
7.  Topalov, Veselin 		g BUL 2640  40 15.03.75 M 2700 40
8.  Gelfand, Boris 		g BLR 2685  29 24.06.68 M 2700 24
9.  Shirov, Alexei 		g ESP 2695  61 04.07.72 M 2690 38
10. Polgar, Judit (GM) 		g HUN 2635  31 23.07.76 F 2675 29
29. Illescas Cordoba, Miguel 	g ESP 2620  45 03.12.65 M 2635 18


VSB Thanks for the Memories
---------------------------

1st VSB 7-14 May 1987 Amsterdam 6 rounds
-----------------------------------------------

Karpov, Anatoly 	g RUS 23.05.51	4
Timman, Jan H 		g NED 14.12.51	4
Korchnoi, Viktor 	g SUI 23.03.31	2.5
Van Der Wiel, John T.H. g NED 09.08.59	1.5

2nd VSB 9-17 March 1988	Amsterdam 6 rounds
-------------------------------------------

Short, Nigel D. 	g ENG 01.06.65	4
Karpov, Anatoly 	g RUS 23.05.51	3.5
Ljubojevic, Ljubomir 	g YUG 02.11.50	3.5
Timman, Jan H 		g NED 14.12.51	1

3rd VSB 16-23 March 1989  Amsterdam 6 rounds
--------------------------------------------

Timman, Jan H 		g NED 14.12.51	4.5
Short, Nigel D. 	g ENG 01.06.65	4
Salov, Valery 		g RUS 26.05.64	3
Hjartarson, Johann 	g ISL 08.02.63	0.5

4th VSB 10-17 May 1990  Rotterdam 6 rounds
---------------------------------------------

Korchnoi, Viktor 	g SUI 23.03.31	4
Gurevich, Mikhail 	g BEL 22.02.59	3.5
Timman, Jan H 		g NED 14.12.51	3
Short, Nigel D. 	g ENG 01.06.65	1.5

5th VSB 1-13 May 1991  Amsterdam 9 rounds
------------------------------------------

Salov, Valery 		g RUS 26.05.64	6
Short, Nigel D. 	g ENG 01.06.65	6
Karpov, Anatoly 	g RUS 23.05.51	5.5
Kasparov, Gary 		g RUS 13.04.63	5.5
Korchnoi, Viktor 	g SUI 23.03.31	4.5
Hjartarson, Johann 	g ISL 08.02.63	4
Timman, Jan H 		g NED 14.12.51	4
Gurevich, Mikhail 	g BEL 22.02.59	3.5
Van Der Wiel, John T.H. g NED 09.08.59	3
Ljubojevic, Ljubomir 	g YUG 02.11.50	3

6th VSB 14-21 May 1992  Amsterdam 6 rounds
-------------------------------------------

Short, Nigel D. 	g ENG 01.06.65	3.5
Anand, Viswanathan 	g IND 11.12.69	3.5
Timman, Jan H 		g NED 14.12.51	2.5
Seirawan, Yasser 	g USA 24.03.60	2.5

7th VSB 6-13 May 1993  Amsterdam 6 rounds
-------------------------------------------

Anand, Viswanathan 	g IND 11.12.69	3.5
Kramnik, Vladimir 	g RUS 25.06.75	3.5
Short, Nigel D. 	g ENG 01.06.65	3.5
Piket, Jeroen 		g NED 27.01.69	1.5

8th VSB 12-19 May 1994  Amsterdam 6 rounds
-------------------------------------------

Kasparov, Gary 		g RUS 13.04.63	4
Ivanchuk, Vassily 	g UKR 18.03.69	3.5
Timman, Jan H 		g NED 14.12.51	2.5
Short, Nigel D. 	g ENG 01.06.65	2

9th VSB 12-18 May 1995  Amsterdam 6 rounds
------------------------------------------

Lautier, Joel 		g FRA 12.04.73	4
Kasparov, Gary 		g RUS 13.04.63	3.5
Topalov, Veselin 	g BUL 15.03.75	2.5
Piket, Jeroen 		g NED 27.01.69	2

10th VSB 22 March - 1 April 1996 Amsterdam 9 rounds
--------------------------------------------------

Amsterdam (NED), III-IV 1996.                    cat. XVIII (2679)
-----------------------------------------------------------------
                                   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0
-----------------------------------------------------------------
 1 Topalov, Veselin    g BUL 2700  * 1 0 1 0 1 = 1 1 1  6.5  2842
 2 Kasparov, Gary      g RUS 2775  0 * = 1 1 = 1 1 1 =  6.5  2834
 3 Short, Nigel D      g ENG 2665  1 = * 0 = 0 = 1 = 1  5.0  2723
 4 Anand, Viswanathan  g IND 2725  0 0 1 * 1 = = = = 1  5.0  2716
 5 Kramnik, Vladimir   g RUS 2775  1 0 = 0 * = 1 = = =  4.5  2668
 6 Lautier, Joel       g FRA 2630  0 = 1 = = * 0 1 0 1  4.5  2684
 7 Seirawan, Yasser    g USA 2630  = 0 = = 0 1 * 0 1 =  4.0  2641
 8 Gelfand, Boris      g BLR 2700  0 0 0 = = 0 1 * 1 =  3.5  2596
 9 Piket, Jeroen       g NED 2570  0 0 = = = 1 0 0 * =  3.0  2566
10 Timman, Jan H       g NED 2620  0 = 0 0 = 0 = = = *  2.5  2519
-----------------------------------------------------------------

3) Chess in the Schools International New York
--------------------------------------------

My thanks to Eric Schiller who reported at length on this
event on the internet until someone stole his computer.

This event saw Michael Adams stamp his authority early
on the event and he ran out a convincing winner. Half
the prize money was for wins and Michael did the best
on this front also. Whether he will have the energy
to do well in the now progressing New York open remains
to be seen.

Round 1 (1996.03.22)

Sokolov, Ivan           - Sunye Neto, Jaime        1-0   37  E48  Nimzo indian
Salov, Valery           - Benjamin, Joel           1/2   12  A46  Queen's pawn
Wolff, Patrick G        - Korchnoi, Viktor         1-0   45  B66  Sicilian
De Firmian, Nick E      - Serper, Grigory          1/2   48  B88  Sicilian
Dzindzichashvili, Roman - Ashley, Maurice          1/2   44  A47  Queen's pawn
Waitzkin, Joshua        - Adams, Michael           0-1   44  C50  Gioci piano

Round 2 (1996.03.23)

Adams, Michael          - Wolff, Patrick G         1-0   38  B50  Sicilian
Sokolov, Ivan           - Waitzkin, Joshua         1-0   36  D26  Queen's gambit; Exchange
Benjamin, Joel          - Dzindzichashvili, Roman  1/2   16  B07  Pirc
Korchnoi, Viktor        - Salov, Valery            1-0   40  E41  Nimzo indian
Sunye Neto, Jaime       - Serper, Grigory          1/2   60  A11  English; 1.c4
Ashley, Maurice         - De Firmian, Nick E       0-1   75  D32  Queen's gambit

Round 3 (1996.03.24)

Salov, Valery           - Adams, Michael           1/2   56  A53  Benoni
Wolff, Patrick G        - Sokolov, Ivan            1/2   41  C50  Gioci piano
De Firmian, Nick E      - Benjamin, Joel           1/2   16  B80  Sicilian
Serper, Grigory         - Ashley, Maurice          1-0   61  A30  English; 1.c4 c5
Dzindzichashvili, Roman - Korchnoi, Viktor         1/2   67  D26  Queen's gambit; Exchange
Waitzkin, Joshua        - Sunye Neto, Jaime        1-0   39  B93  Sicilian; Najdorf

Round 4 (1996.03.25)

Adams, Michael          - Dzindzichashvili, Roman  1/2   31  B66  Sicilian
Sokolov, Ivan           - Salov, Valery            1/2   68  A90  Dutch defence
Benjamin, Joel          - Serper, Grigory          1/2   38  B22  Sicilian; Alapin (2.c3)
Korchnoi, Viktor        - De Firmian, Nick E       1-0   47  A04  Reti (1.Pf3)
Sunye Neto, Jaime       - Ashley, Maurice          1-0   22  A18  English; 1.c4
Waitzkin, Joshua        - Wolff, Patrick G         0-1   40  B50  Sicilian

Round 5 (1996.03.26)

Salov, Valery           - Waitzkin, Joshua         1/2   70  D27  Queen's gambit; Exchange
Wolff, Patrick G        - Sunye Neto, Jaime        1/2   24  B92  Sicilian; Najdorf
De Firmian, Nick E      - Adams, Michael           0-1   33  C89  Ruy Lopez
Serper, Grigory         - Korchnoi, Viktor         0-1   29  A29  English; 1.c4 e5
Dzindzichashvili, Roman - Sokolov, Ivan            1/2   33  A22  English; 1.c4 e5
Ashley, Maurice         - Benjamin, Joel           0-1   32  B49  Sicilian

Round 6 (1996.03.27)

Adams, Michael          - Serper, Grigory          1-0   31  B66  Sicilian
Sokolov, Ivan           - De Firmian, Nick E       1/2   23  E32  Nimzo indian
Korchnoi, Viktor        - Ashley, Maurice          1-0   36  A18  English; 1.c4
Wolff, Patrick G        - Salov, Valery            1/2   43  B83  Sicilian
Sunye Neto, Jaime       - Benjamin, Joel           1/2   54  A29  English; 1.c4 e5
Waitzkin, Joshua        - Dzindzichashvili, Roman  1/2   80  D41  Queen's gambit

Round 7 (1996.03.29)

Benjamin, Joel          - Korchnoi, Viktor         1-0   40  C07  French; Tarrasch
Salov, Valery           - Sunye Neto, Jaime        1/2   64  E49  Nimzo indian
De Firmian, Nick E      - Waitzkin, Joshua         1-0   29  B00  1.e4
Serper, Grigory         - Sokolov, Ivan            1-0   33  A20  English; 1.c4 e5
Dzindzichashvili, Roman - Wolff, Patrick G         1/2   49  A25  English; 1.c4 e5
Ashley, Maurice         - Adams, Michael           1/2   59  E44  Nimzo indian

Round 8 (1996.03.30)

Adams, Michael          - Benjamin, Joel           1-0   27  B22  Sicilian; Alapin (2.c3)
Sokolov, Ivan           - Ashley, Maurice          1-0   36  E42  Nimzo indian
Salov, Valery           - Dzindzichashvili, Roman  1-0   50  B36  Sicilian
Wolff, Patrick G        - De Firmian, Nick E       1-0   44  B04  Alekhine defence
Sunye Neto, Jaime       - Korchnoi, Viktor         0-1   40  A06  Reti (1.Pf3)
Waitzkin, Joshua        - Serper, Grigory          0-1   40  B17  Caro-Kann

Round 9 (1996.03.31)

Benjamin, Joel          - Sokolov, Ivan            1/2   64  A28  English; 1.c4 e5
Korchnoi, Viktor        - Adams, Michael           0-1   41  E17  Nimzo indian
De Firmian, Nick E      - Salov, Valery            0-1   71  B88  Sicilian
Serper, Grigory         - Wolff, Patrick G         0-1   45  A31  English; 1.c4 c5
Dzindzichashvili, Roman - Sunye Neto, Jaime        0-1   49  A30  English; 1.c4 c5
Ashley, Maurice         - Waitzkin, Joshua         1-0   54  A28  English; 1.c4 e5

Round 10 (1996.04.01)

Sokolov, Ivan           - Korchnoi, Viktor         1-0   41  E44  Nimzo indian
Salov, Valery           - Serper, Grigory          1-0   92  B70  Sicilian; Dragon
Wolff, Patrick G        - Ashley, Maurice          1/2   33  B06  Modern defence
Dzindzichashvili, Roman - De Firmian, Nick E       1/2   59  E43  Nimzo indian
Sunye Neto, Jaime       - Adams, Michael           1/2   42  A29  English; 1.c4 e5
Waitzkin, Joshua        - Benjamin, Joel           1/2   63  B47  Sicilian

Round 11 (1996.04.02)

Adams, Michael          - Sokolov, Ivan            1/2   36  C90  Ruy Lopez
Benjamin, Joel          - Wolff, Patrick G         1-0   27  B22  Sicilian; Alapin (2.c3)
Korchnoi, Viktor        - Waitzkin, Joshua         1-0   35  A07  Reti (1.Pf3)
De Firmian, Nick E      - Sunye Neto, Jaime        1-0   42  B90  Sicilian; Najdorf
Serper, Grigory         - Dzindzichashvili, Roman  1/2   43  E70  Kings indian
Ashley, Maurice         - Salov, Valery            1/2   36  B81  Sicilian


New York USA (USA), III-IV 1996.                          cat. XIII (2571)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1 Adams, Michael           g ENG 2660  * = 1 1 = 1 1 1 = = = 1  8.5  2774
 2 Sokolov, Ivan            g BIH 2665  = * = 1 = = = 0 = 1 1 1  7.0  2664
 3 Benjamin, Joel           g USA 2570  0 = * 1 = 1 = = = = 1 =  6.5  2636
 4 Korchnoi, Viktor         g SUI 2645  0 0 0 * 1 0 1 1 = 1 1 1  6.5  2629
 5 Salov, Valery            g RUS 2670  = = = 0 * = 1 1 1 = = =  6.5  2627
 6 Wolff, Patrick G         g USA 2565  0 = 0 1 = * 1 1 = = = 1  6.5  2636
 7 De Firmian, Nick E       g USA 2595  0 = = 0 0 0 * = = 1 1 1  5.0  2533
 8 Serper, Grigory          g UZB 2540  0 1 = 0 0 0 = * = = 1 1  5.0  2538
 9 Dzindzichashvili, Roman  g USA 2545  = = = = 0 = = = * 0 = =  4.5  2508
10 Sunye Neto, Jaime        g BRA 2505  = 0 = 0 = = 0 = 1 * 1 0  4.5  2512
11 Ashley, Maurice          m USA 2460  = 0 0 0 = = 0 0 = 0 * 1  3.0  2406
12 Waitzkin, Joshua         m USA 2435  0 0 = 0 = 0 0 0 = 1 0 *  2.5  2372
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

4) New York Open. Newark
---------------------

My thanks to Vadim Kaminsky for the games from the
New York Open. Its many schedules make the event
difficult to follow at the start. Here are the
standings as posted to compuserve for the 7th round
by Gabriel Sanchez.

 SCORE  TITLE  NAME                  RATING STATE

   6.0   g VAN WELY, LOEK             2570   NED
   6.0   g STEFANSSON, HANNES         2540   ISL
   6.0   m LUGO, BLAS                 2370   USA
   5.5   g ADAMS, MICHAEL             2660   ENG
   5.5   g CHERNIN, ALEXANDER         2595   HUN
   5.5   g YERMOLINSKY, ALEX          2565   USA
   5.5   g DZINDZICHASHVILI, ROMAN    2545   USA
   5.5   g ZAITSHIK, GENNADI          2540   GEO
   5.5   g GARCIA, GILDARDO           2525   COL
   5.5   g FEDOROWICZ, JOHN           2515   USA
   5.5   g POLULIAKHOV, ALEKSANDR     2480   RUS
   5.5     GAMBOA, NELSON             2390   COL
   5.0   g EHLVEST, JAAN              2660   EST
   5.0   g SERPER, GRIGORY            2540   UZB
   5.0   g FISHBEIN, ALEXANDER        2515   USA
   5.0   g SCHWARTZMAN, GABRIEL       2510   USA
   5.0   m SEVILLANO, ENRICO          2470   PHI
   5.0   m VUCIC, MLADEN              2370   USA
   4.5   g DE FIRMIAN, NICK           2595   USA
   4.5   g HJARTARSON, JOHANN         2570   ISL
   4.5   g KUDRIN, SERGEY             2535   USA
   4.5   g IVANOV, ALEXANDER          2525   USA
   4.5   g BLATNY, PAVEL              2515   CZE
   4.5   m THORHALLSSON, THRASTUR     2445   ISL
   4.5   f FOYGEL, IGOR               2430   USA
   4.5   m REMLINGER, LARRY           2420   USA
   4.5     SHLIPERMAN, IGOR           2390   USA
   4.5   g BISGUIER, ARTHUR           2385   USA
   4.5   f TATE, EMORY A.             2380   USA
   4.5   f BURNETT, RONALD WA         2375   USA
   4.5     BOTTEMA, TOM               2370   NED
   4.5   f KARKLINS, ANDREW           2335   USA
   4.5   m BONIN, JAY                 2325   USA
   4.5   f LA ROTA, FABIO             2320   COL
   4.5     RODRIGUEZ, ROBERTO         2265   USA
   4.0   g BESHUKOV, SERGEI           2450   RUS
   4.0   m SHAKED, TAL                2440   USA
   4.0   m KAUFMAN, LAWRENCE          2425   USA
   4.0   m LYRBERG, PATRICK           2425   SWE
   4.0     KREIMAN, BORIS             2415   USA
   4.0     RUSSELL, RICHARD L.        2400   USA
   4.0   m SITURU, NATHANAEL          2385   INA
   4.0   m WATSON, JOHN L             2385   USA
   4.0   m ALZATE, DARIO              2375   COL
   4.0     PERELSHTEYN, JEAN          2370   USA
   4.0   f KELLEHER, WILLIAM          2350   USA
   4.0     TUNASLY, KIFLY             2345   INA
   4.0   f CUNNINGHAM, ROBIN          2330   USA
   4.0   g BELAKOVSKAYA, ANJELINA     2315   USA
   4.0   g DENKER, ARNOLD             2305   USA
   4.0     CASTANEDA, NELSON          2304   USA
   4.0   f STOYKO, STEPHEN            2295   USA
   4.0   f PASCHALL, WILLIAM          2285   USA
   4.0     WHEELER, JERRY T           2285   USA
   4.0   f ANDERSON, RENARD W.        2270   USA
   4.0   f DOLGITSER, KONSTAN         2270   USA
   4.0     TEODORO, EDUARDO D         2265   CAN
   4.0     KWARTLER, LONNIE S         2255   USA
   4.0     SHAHADE, GREGORY           2250   USA
   4.0     ALVAREZ, FRANKLIN R.       2250   DOM
   4.0     ANGELOV, GEORGI            2240   BUL
   4.0     BELLIARD, LUIS             2210   DOM
   4.0     ENCARNACION, ERNES         2200   USA
   4.0   m KOSKELA, NIINA             2170   FIN
   4.0     MOSKOW, ERIC D.            2165   USA
   3.5   f HERTAN, CHARLES E          2395   USA
   3.5   m ZLOTNIKOV, MIKHAIL         2390   USA
   3.5     FILATOV, LEONID            2300   USA
   3.5   f WEERAMANTRY, SUNIL         2295   SRI
   3.5     CASELLA, MICHAEL A.        2290   USA
   3.5     SALOMON, EUGENE J.         2270   USA
   3.5     KHATENA, MOSHE             2255   USA
   3.5   f LEHNER, OLIVER             2250   AUT
   3.5     ALAVA, MIKKO               2240   FIN
   3.5     SAMIMI, ASKARI             2240   USA
   3.5     RAUBAL, MARTIN             2230   AUT
   3.5     NIEMINEN, KARI             2225   FIN
   3.5     VERDU, MIGUEL J            2221   USA
   3.5     COOKE, ERIC N              2215   USA
   3.5     VIHINEN, TEEMU             2215   FIN
   3.5     MENGARINI, ARIEL A         2215   USA
   3.5     IPPOLITO, DEAN             2205   USA
   3.5     REA, ANDREW B              2200   USA
   3.5     MAYER, STEVE               2190   USA
   3.5     IGLESIAS LEON, FRANCISCO J 2000   ESP
   3.5     ARNARSSON, HRANNAR         2000   ICE
   3.5     BRYANT, SHERMAN            2000   USA
   3.0     MASON, WILLIAM             2310   USA
   3.0   f RABINOVICH, ARKADY         2305   USA
   3.0     SHUSHKOVSKY, SAM           2300   USA
   3.0   f FRIEDMAN, JOSEF            2290   USA
   3.0     SCHILLER, ERIC             2270   USA
   3.0     GANAUS, HANNES             2235   AUT
   3.0     SCHWARTZ, YLON             2235   USA
   3.0     KOSKINEN, HENRI            2230   FIN
   3.0     WEISZENBECK, MANUEL        2225   AUT
   3.0     SIEGEL, NOAH J             2220   USA
   3.0   f HERNANDEZ, YADIRA          2215   MEX
   3.0     KURTZMAN, MARK             2206   USA
   3.0     MIRABILE, TIM              2205   USA
   3.0     BOROSS-HARMER, PETER       2200   CAN
   3.0     COLDING, ERNEST            2200   USA
   3.0     KRIPS, GENNADIY            2200   USA
   3.0   M KOREN, INNA                2195   USA
   3.0     RUIZ, MAURICIO             2195   USA
   3.0   f FERNANDEZ, MARINO          2190   DOM
   3.0     MAC ARTHUR, JOHN           2190   USA
   3.0     BECKMAN, THOMAS J.         2175   USA
   3.0     WALKER, LEIGH M            2165   USA
   3.0     LAWSON, BRIAN              2165   USA
   3.0     MC CLELLAND, SHEAR         2145   USA
   3.0     CENAL GUTIERREZ, RUBEN     2000   ESP
   2.5     KREITNER, ILAN             2320   USA
   2.5     GELMAN, CHARLES            2205   USA
   2.5     LEVINE, VIKTOR S           2186   USA
   2.5     DE OLIVEIRA, PAULO         2180   BRA
   2.5     STRENZWILK, DENIS F.       2155   USA
   2.5     MURPHY, RICHARD            2129   USA
   2.5     MANDIC, VLADIMIR           2081   YUG
   2.5     ESKOLA, RISTO              2000   FIN
   2.5     SHAHADE, JENNIFER          1946   USA
   2.0     SHURE, GARY                2250   USA
   2.0     SOLANKI, VINOD N           2210   USA
   2.0     WEST, JAMES                2210   USA
   2.0     CAMPIZ, LEONARDO           2205   PUR
   2.0     SONG, PAUL                 2190   USA
   2.0     FISCHER, ROBERT J.         2165   USA
   2.0     GAVORA, LES                2067   USA
   2.0     RITVIN, STANISLAV          2059   USA
   2.0     BUGBEE, BRIAN              2016   USA
   2.0     PINEAULT, WAYNE B          2008   USA
   2.0     DEL MUNDO, HERCULES        2000   USA
   2.0     HAMBERGER, JOSEF           2000   AUT
   2.0     LARA, DANIEL               2000   USA
   2.0     BELLIARD, HECTOR           2000   DOM
   2.0     VILLETA, LUIS              2000   DOM
   2.0     RODRIGUEZ, EGBERTO         2000   USA
   2.0     ATKINS, MICHAEL            1990   USA
   2.0     GAUER, PAUL                1956   USA
   2.0     BAUZA MERCERE, EDUARDO     1915   USA
   2.0     ARGOMANIZ, FRANCIS         1810   DOM
   2.0     ALVAREZ, TIRSO A.          1807   DOM
   2.0     STEPHANO, PHILIP           1567   USA
   1.5     BAUMGARTNER, REINHARD      2000   AUS
   1.5     MARTINOVICS, GEORG         1440   USA
   1.0     COLEMAN, MARK              2045   USA
   1.0     HARDEMAN, BEAU A           1837   USA
   1.0     BELCHER, EDWARD A.         1731   USA
   0.5   f SALMAN, JOEL               2235   USA
   0.5     MARCOS, EMILIO             2000   MEX


5) Polish Championships, Brzeg Dolny
--------------------------------

A strong representative Polish National Championships took place
in Brzeg Dolny during March. There were clear victors in both
the men's and women's events.

My thanks to Dr. Andrzej Polozowski and Piotr Kaczorowski who
seperately sent me the results of these events.

Brzeg Dolny (POL), III 1996.    9-24.03.1996 Nat-ch  cat. IX (2473)
------------------------------------------------------------------
                                       1234567890123456
------------------------------------------------------------------
 1 Urban, Klaudiusz         m POL 2440 *=====1====1=11=  9.5  2569
 2 Grabarczyk, Bogdan       f POL 2420 =*===1=1==0=1110  9.0  2548
 3 Wojtkiewicz, Aleksander  g POL 2550 ==*=11=1===0=1==  9.0  2539
 4 Markowski, Tomasz        m POL 2535 ===*0===11====11  9.0  2540
 5 Grabarczyk, Miroslaw     m POL 2505 ==01*=1====0==11  8.5  2520
 6 Kuczynski, Robert        g POL 2495 =00==*===111===1  8.5  2521
 7 Krasenkow, Michal        g POL 2610 0===0=*=1==01111  8.5  2513
 8 Pedzich, Dominik         m POL 2425 =00====*===1=1=1  8.0  2496
 9 Socko, Bartosz           m POL 2455 ===0==0=*=1=10=1  7.5  2473
10 Gdanski, Jacek           m POL 2480 ===0=0===*=1===1  7.5  2472
11 Kempinski, Robert        m POL 2475 =1===0==0=*1===0  7.0  2451
12 Czerwonski, Aleksander     POL 2400 0=1=1010=00*01=1  7.0  2456
13 Kaminski, Marcin         m POL 2525 =0====0=0==1*==1  7.0  2448
14 Bobras, Piotr            f POL 2355 000===001==0=*=1  5.5  2385
15 Matlak, Marek            m POL 2450 00=00=0=======*=  5.0  2349
16 Oliwa, Marek               POL 2440 =1=00000001000=*  3.5  2263
------------------------------------------------------------------

Brzeg Dolny (POL), III 1996.    11-24.03.1996.  Nat-ch (women) cat. VI (2180)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1 Brustman, Agnieszka  wg POL 2320  * 1 = 0 1 = 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1  10.0  2380
 2 Aksiuczyc, Monika       POL 2120  0 * 0 = 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1   9.5  2360
 3 Zielinska, Marta     wm POL 2250  = 1 * 1 = 1 1 0 1 = = = = =   8.5  2285
 4 Dworakowska, Joanna  wm POL 2265  1 = 0 * 1 = = 1 = 1 = 1 0 =   8.0  2260
 5 Bobrowska, Monika    wg POL 2305  0 0 = 0 * 1 1 = 1 1 0 = 1 1   7.5  2227
 6 Radziewicz, Iweta    wf POL 2240  = 0 0 = 0 * 1 1 = = 1 = 1 1   7.5  2232
 7 Romaszko, Sylwia        POL 2050  1 0 0 = 0 0 * 0 = 0 1 1 = 1   5.5  2133
 8 Guzkowska, Magdalena wf POL 2235  0 0 1 0 = 0 1 * 0 = 0 1 1 =   5.5  2119
 9 Blimke, Dalia        wf POL 2150  0 0 0 = 0 = = 1 * = 1 1 0 =   5.5  2125
10 Kaczorowska, Barbara wm POL 2200  0 0 = 0 0 = 1 = = * 0 = 1 1   5.5  2121
11 Henc, Renata         wf POL 2115  0 0 = = 1 0 0 1 0 1 * 0 1 0   5.0  2098
12 Kludacz, Magdalena      POL 2105  0 0 = 0 = = 0 0 0 = 1 * 1 1   5.0  2099
13 Iwaniuk, Dorota      wf POL 2090  0 1 = 1 0 0 = 0 1 0 0 0 * =   4.5  2077
14 Szczygiel, Agnieszka wf POL 2080  0 0 = = 0 0 0 = = 0 1 0 = *   3.5  2013
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

6) Cannes Chess Festival
---------------------

There were 11 players sharing first in this open tournament,
Tkachiev was top on tie-break. My thanks to Christophe Bouton for the
games and news of these events which were in February. The scores are
correct (but I can't find the tie-break system) down to 24th.
The rest were generated from the games and I added the byes where
obvious.

I made a guess at the result of the game in round 8 between Pavasovic
and Santo Roman.

Cannes (FRA), II 1996.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                            1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1 Tkachiev, Vladislav         g KAZ 2600  +30 +27 +12 + 4 = 5 = 2 =31 =16 = 8  6.5 /9  2681
 2 Dorfman, Josif D            g FRA 2580  +34 +28 =25 =38 + 7 = 1 +11 = 4 = 6  6.5 /9  2659
 3 Sermek, Drazen              g SLO 2535  +52 +14 =18 +21 =15 = 5 = 4 +31 =11  6.5 /9  2649
 4 Sadler, Matthew             g ENG 2600  +48 +50 + 7 - 1 +25 =11 = 3 = 2 +16  6.5 /9  2662
 5 Gallagher, Joseph G         g SUI 2525  +51 +35 +36 =25 = 1 = 3 = 6 +26 = 7  6.5 /9  2636
 6 Cvitan, Ognjen              g CRO 2540  +67 =16 =47 =15 +41 +36 = 5 +14 = 2  6.5 /9  2602
 7 Chatalbashev, Boris         m BUL 2455  +75 +31 - 4 +30 - 2 +62 +43 +15 = 5  6.5 /9  2620
 8 Palac, Mladen               g CRO 2545  +46 -25 +79 =51 +21 =26 +20 +28 = 1  6.5 /9  2614
 9 Cebalo, Miso                g CRO 2495  =63 -62 +75 +74 =35 =51 +46 +24 +20  6.5 /9  2528
10 Todorcevic, Miodrag         g YUG 2450  =72 +80 -43 =78 +71 +45 =17 +39 +31  6.5 /9  2561
11 Anastasian, Ashot           g ARM 2520  +29 -15 +37 +47 +16 = 4 - 2 +36 = 3  6.0 /9  2589
12 Nikcevic, Nebojsa           m YUG 2485  +56 +40 - 1 =46 =29 =35 +51 =13 +28  6.0 /9  2544
13 Groszpeter, Attila          g HUN 2565  +58 -18 -30 +76 +44 =42 +59 =12 +25  6.0 /9  2543
14 David, Alberto              m LUX 2455  +64 - 3 -45 +72 +73 +57 +19 - 6 +26  6.0 /9  2541
15 Matamoros Franco, Carlos S  m ECU 2430  +53 +11 +26 = 6 = 3 =20 =28 - 7 =22  5.5 /9  2556
16 Hauchard, Arnaud            m FRA 2460  +77 = 6 +33 =62 -11 +29 +38 = 1 - 4  5.5 /9  2530
17 Lputian, Smbat G            g ARM 2580  =37 +78 -21 +33 +18 =28 =10 -20 +38  5.5 /9  2495
18 Rotstein, Arkadij           g UKR 2445  +74 +13 = 3 -36 -17 =37 +62 +43 =32  5.5 /9  2521
19 Touzane, Olivier            m FRA 2500  +54 =44 -41 =35 +58 +47 -14 =21 +40  5.5 /9  2477
20 Godena, Michele             m ITA 2485  +76 =43 =44 +41 +62 =15 - 8 +17 - 9  5.5 /9  2508
21 Georgiev, Vladimir          m BUL 2435  =80 +72 +17 - 3 - 8 =32 +45 =19 +37  5.5 /9  2530
22 Kazhgaleyev, Murtas         m KAZ 2490  -70 +54 =58 -29 +70 +41 =42 +47 =15  5.5 /9  2465
23 Barlov, Dragan              g YUG 2460  =78 =37 =70 =71 -57 +66 +58 =42 +36  5.5 /9  2436
24 Lerch, Patrice                FRA 2280  -36 +82 -35 =56 +79 +65 +27 - 9 +42  5.5 /9  2468
25 Hachian, Melik              m ARM 2440  +61 + 8 = 2 = 5 - 4 +39 -26 +35 -13  5.0 /9  2548
26 Zelcic, Robert              m CRO 2495  +57 +70 -15 +43 =36 = 8 +25 - 5 -14  5.0 /9  2461
27 Summerscale, Aaron          m ENG 2465  +45 - 1 =40 +53 -46 +34 -24 +51 =30  5.0 /9  2414
28 Bricard, Emmanuel           m FRA 2470  +68 - 2 +56 +44 +45 =17 =15 - 8 -12  5.0 /9  2490
29 Gerber, Richard             f SUI 2355  -11 +60 =50 +22 =12 -16 -39 +71 +47  5.0 /9  2484
30 Jelen, Igor                 m SLO 2400  - 1 +64 +13 - 7 -39 =71 +68 +57 =27  5.0 /9  2478
31 Minasian, Artashes          g ARM 2580  +79 - 7 +34 +48 =38 +46 = 1 - 3 -10  5.0 /9  2489
32 Hamdouchi, Hichem           g MAR 2535  =62 +63 -38 =79 =48 =21 =35 +46 =18  5.0 /9  2441
33 Boyd, Stephen                 CAN 2315  +59 +65 -16 -17 -37 +76 =52 +62 =41  5.0 /9  2468
34 Jurkovic, Hrvoje              CRO 2390  - 2 +76 -31 =49 +74 -27 =71 +60 +50  5.0 /9  2448
35 Fercec, Nenad               m CRO 2405  +66 - 5 +24 =19 = 9 =12 =32 -25 =39  4.5 /9  2451
36 Zaja, Ivan                    CRO 2405  +24 +39 - 5 +18 =26 - 6 +50 -11 -23  4.5 /9  2473
37 Golubovic, Boris              CRO 2385  =17 =23 -11 =66 +33 =18 =57 +53 -21  4.5 /9  2409
38 Pavasovic, Dusko            m SLO 2425  =49 +71 +32 = 2 =31 =43 -16 =50 -17  4.5 /9  2455
39 Strikovic, Aleksa           m YUG 2520  +73 -36 -46 +55 +30 -25 +29 -10 =35  4.5 /9  2391
40 Aronian, Levon              f ARM 2310  +42 -12 =27 =58 -47 +67 =41 +59 -19  4.5 /9  2400
41 Piankov, Evgenij            m UKR 2410  =81 +55 +19 -20 - 6 -22 =40 +73 =33  4.5 /9  2402
42 Hebert, Jean                m CAN 2435  -40 -45 +69 +61 +78 =13 =22 =23 -24  4.5 /9  2378
43 Olivier, Jean-Christophe      FRA 2280  +82 =20 +10 -26 +50 =38 - 7 -18 =48  4.5 /9  2411
44 Bernard, Christophe         f FRA 2405  +60 =19 =20 -28 -13 -73 +78 =54 +64  4.5 /9  2405
45 Lukasiewicz, Grzegorz       f POL 2330  -27 +42 +14 +59 -28 -10 -21 =48 =51  4.0 /9  2390
46 Knezevic, Bojan             f YUG 2380  - 8 +68 +39 =12 +27 -31 - 9 -32 =57  4.0 /9  2435
47 Bauer, Christian            m FRA 2430  =71 +49 = 6 -11 +40 -19 +73 -22 -29  4.0 /9  2364
48 Giffard, Nicolas            m FRA 2400  - 4 +57 +66 -31 =32 -50 =64 =45 =43  4.0 /9  2374
49 Etchegaray, Patrice         m FRA 2295  =38 -47 -55 =34 =75 =63 +67 =52 =54  4.0 /9  2283
50 Santo-Roman, Marc           m FRA 2480  +69 - 4 =29 +70 -43 +48 -36 =38 -34  4.0 /9  2349
51 Kovacevic, Slobodan         m YUG 2355  - 5 =75 +80 = 8 +65 = 9 -12 -27 =45  4.0 /9  2397
52 Mantovani, Renzo            m ITA 2365  - 3 =53 -74 =77 =64 +72 =33 =49 =55  4.0 /9  2298
53 Verat, Laurent              f FRA 2300  -15 =52 +67 -27 +56 -59 +70 -37 =58  4.0 /9  2305
54 Loeffler, Markus              GER 2350  -19 -22 -64 +69 =72 +74 =60 =44 =49  4.0 /9  2320
55 Weindl, Alfred              f GER 2335  =65 -41 +49 -39 -59 -60 +66 +70 =52  4.0 /9  2336
56 Brumen, Dinko               f CRO 2335  -12 +61 -28 =24 -53 -64 =72 +75 +71  4.0 /9  2304
57 Kleinplatz, Sam             f CAN 2345  -26 -48 +77 +81 +23 -14 =37 -30 =46  4.0 /9  2356
58 Collas, Didier              f FRA 2380  -13 +77 =22 =40 -19 +78 -23 =64 =53  4.0 /9  2357
59 Haik, Aldo                  m FRA 2440  -33 +81 -62 -45 +55 +53 -13 -40 +68  4.0 /9  2307
60 Berthelot, Yannick          f FRA 2280  -44 -29 -76 +82 =63 +55 =54 -34 +73  4.0 /9  2271
61 Mauro, Alan                 f ITA 2315  -25 -56 +82 -42 =76 -70 +80 +65  .   3.5 /8  2281
62 Stefanova, Antoaneta       wg BUL 2370  =32 + 9 +59 =16 -20 - 7 -18 -33 =69  3.5 /9  2360
63 Estrada Nieto, Julian       f MEX 2345  = 9 -32 -71 =68 =60 =49 =65 =69 =66  3.5 /9  2291
64 Claverie, Christophe          FRA 2325  -14 -30 +54 -65 =52 +56 =48 =58 -44  3.5 /9  2316
65 Sulava, Nenad               m CRO 2480  =55 -33 =72 +64 -51 -24 =63 -61 +76  3.5 /9  2246
66 David, Vincent                FRA 2285  -35 +73 -48 =37 =67 -23 -55 +78 =63  3.5 /9  2288
67 Karr,JP                           ----  - 6 =74 -53 +75 =66 -40 -49 =72 +77  3.5 /9  2256
68 Koerholz, Ludger              GER 2335  -28 -46 -73 =63 +77 +81 -30 +76 -59  3.5 /9  2291
69 Medak, Damir                f CRO 2335  -50 -79 -42 -54 +82 =75 +81 =63 =62  3.5 /9  2231
70 Medancic, Rikard            m CRO 2340  +22 -26 =23 -50 -22 +61 -53 -55 =72  3.0 /9  2285
71 Perdomo, Carlos Andres        COL 2305  =47 -38 +63 =23 -10 =30 =34 -29 -56  3.0 /9  2273
72 Goldgewicht, Lionel           FRA 2325  =10 -21 =65 -14 =54 -52 =56 =67 =70  3.0 /9  2260
73 Levacic, Patrik               CRO 2350  -39 -66 +68 +80 -14 +44 -47 -41 -60  3.0 /9  2256
74 Bolding, Klaus                FRA 2320  -18 =67 +52 - 9 -34 -54 =75 -80 +78  3.0 /9  2235
75 Peric, Slavisa              f YUG 2325  - 7 =51 - 9 -67 =49 =69 =74 -56 +81  3.0 /9  2273
76 Zichichi, Alvise            m ITA 2340  -20 -34 +60 -13 =61 -33 +77 -68 -65  2.5 /9  2221
77 Lazovic, Gordan             f CRO 2325  -16 -58 -57 =52 -68 +80 -76 +81 -67  2.5 /9  2213
78 Drei, Andrea                f ITA 2325  =23 -17 +81 =10 -42 -58 -44 -66 -74  2.0 /9  2181
79 Ivanov, Jordan              m BUL 2380  -31 +69 - 8 =32 -24  .   .   .   .   1.5 /5  2306
80 Novak, Danijel                CRO 2315  =21 -10 -51 -73 -81 -77 -61 +74  .   1.5 /8  2104
81 Riou, Ivan                    FRA 2295  =41 -59 -78 -57 +80 -68 -69 -77 -75  1.5 /9  2077
82 BYE                               ----  -43 -24 -61 -60 -69  .   .   .   .   0.0 /5
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Tournament of the Generations Cannes France.
--------------------------------------------

Scheveningen system event. Veterans play French Juniors.

Cannes (FRA), II 1996.
------------------------------------------------------------
                                   Ba Fr Re Le Fo
------------------------------------------------------------
 1 Korchnoi, Viktor     g SUI 2645 11 11 =1 11 11  9.5  2859
 2 Sosonko, Gennadi     g NED 2515 == == =1 =1 11  7.0  2538
 3 Smyslov, Vassily     g RUS 2550 == == 1= =1 =1  6.5  2499
 4 Ivkov, Borislav      g YUG 2455 00 == == 1= 1=  5.0  2389
 5 Mednis, Edmar J      g USA 2405 10 == 0= =0 1=  4.5  2353
------------------------------------------------------------

Cannes (FRA), II 1996.
------------------------------------------------------------
                                   Ko So Sm Iv Me
------------------------------------------------------------
 1 Bacrot, Etienne      f FRA 2425 00 == == 11 01  5.0  2514
 2 Fressinet, Laurent     FRA 2290 00 == == == ==  4.0  2442
   Relange, Eloi        m FRA 2460 =0 =0 0= == 1=  4.0  2442
 4 Lepelletier, Benoit  m FRA 2470 00 =0 =0 0= =1  3.0  2365
 5 Fontaine, Robert       FRA 2300 00 00 =0 0= 0=  1.5  2218
------------------------------------------------------------

7) German Team Cup by Wolfgang Haar
---------------------------------

Here are the complete results of the semi final and the final.
In this event a team can change the order of their players after each
round.

This and some other events can be found on:

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/Wolfgang_Haar


 Semi final:

 Werder Bremen         3 : 1            Koeln Porz
 =================================================
 Hracek,Zbynek         = : =      Lutz,Christopher
 Kindermann,Stefan     = : =        Huebner,Robert
 Blatny,Pavel          1 : 0    Christiansen,Larry
 Knaak,Rainer          1 : 0       Vaganian,Rafael
 -------------------------------------------------

 Schmiden/Canstatt     1 : 3          SF Neukoelln
 =================================================
 Trachtmann,Mark       0 : 1        Berndt,Stephan
 Schnepp,Gunnar        0 : 1         Polzin,Rainer
 Krockenberger,Martin  1 : 0       Weber,Siegfried
 Bauer,?               0 : 1         Schulz,Rainer
 -------------------------------------------------



 Playing for the 3rd place:

 Koeln Porz             4 : 0    Schmiden/Canstatt
 =================================================
 Huebner,Robert         1 : 0       Schnepp,Gunnar
 Lutz,Christopher       1 : 0      Trachtmann,Mark
 Vaganian,Rafael        1 : 0              Bauer,?
 Christiansen,Larry     1 : 0   Pflichthofer,Peter
 -------------------------------------------------


 THE FINAL:

 Werder Bremen       3.5 : 0.5        SF Neukoelln
 =================================================
 Hracek,Zbynek         = : =        Berndt,Stephan
 Kindermann,Stefan     = : =         Polzin,Rainer
 Knaak,Rainer          1 : 0       Weber,Siegfried
 Blatny,Pavel          1 : 0         Schulz,Rainer
 -------------------------------------------------

 So the chess team of SV Werder gets his first title in his history:
 German team cup champions!

Bundesliga
----------

1. Bundesliga 1995/96   13th round 24th March 1996

The values in brackets (BW) are only relevant when several teams has
the same count of team points and game points.
A team get for board 1:
 8  BW-points if his player wins
 4  BW-points if his player draw the game
 no BW-points for a loose.

A team get for board 2:
 7   BW-points if his player wins
 3.5 BW-points if his player draw the game
 no  BW-points for a loose.

and so on...

Delmenhorster SK      -         SK Zaehringen
=============================================
Rogers,I            = : =        Rosentalis,E
Stohl,I             = : =           Hodgson,J
Beckemeyer,W        0 : 1            Siegel,G
Reefschlaeger       = : =              Mohr,S
Borik,O             1 : 0              Mann,C
Breutigam,M         0 : 1           Brendel,O
Wesseln,K           0 : 1          Schmaltz,R
Lauber,A            1 : 0           Vatter,HJ
---------------------------------------------
(15.0)            3.5 : 4.5            (21.0)


SV Werder Bremen      -          SV Tuebingen
=============================================
Kindermann,S        = : =           Horvath,T
Blatny,P            1 : 0           Kulaots,K
Knaak,R             0 : 1             Kraut,K
Heissler,J          = : =            Zeller,F
Meins,G             0 : 1              Hess,R
Meyer,CD            = : =          Dutschak,H
Babula,V            1 : 0             Frick,C
Hedke,F             1 : 0          Von Naso,L
---------------------------------------------
(18.0)            4.5 : 3.5            (18.0)


Hamburger SK          -           Solinger SG
=============================================
Wahls,M             = : =          Jussupow,A
Ftacnik,L           = : =           Gabriel,C
Mowsziszian,K       = : =          Chandler,M
Mueller,K           0 : 1          Bischoff,K
Loeffler,S          = : =               Lau,R
Heinemann,T         1 : 0              Reeh,O
Wegner,H            0 : 1        Podzielny,KH
Sievers,S           0 : 1              Zysk,R
---------------------------------------------
(15.5)            3.0 : 5.0            (20.5)


SV Empor Berlin       -     PSV/BSV Wuppertal
=============================================
Shirov,A            = : =          Schebler,G
Lobron,E            0 : 1          Hausrath,D
Luther,T            0 : 1         Kinsman,APH
Boensch,U           0 : 1         Schiffer,KU
Tischbierek,R       1 : 0         Fischdick,G
Volke,C             1 : 0           Florath,P
Muse,M              1 : 0      Sukharisingh,R
Poldauf,D           1 : 0          Kistella,R
---------------------------------------------
(14.0)            4.5 : 3.5            (22.0)


PSV Duisburg          -             SK Passau
=============================================
Khalifman,A         = : =             Ribli,Z
Nunn,JDM            = : =           Smejkal,J
Unzicker,W          = : =         Schlosser,P
Keitlinghaus,L      1 : 0           Schmidt,P
Enders,P            1 : 0           Pichler,J
Thesing,M           = : =           Baumhus,R
Pirrot,D            = : =             Goetz,R
Prang,E             = : =   Schlingensiepen,C
---------------------------------------------
(22.5)            5.0 : 3.0            (13.5)


SG Porz               -    Muenchener SC 1836
=============================================
Lutz,C              = : =          Hertneck,G
Huebner,R           = : =             Atlas,V
Christiansen,L      = : =         Pezerovic,E
Vaganian,R          = : =            Sandor,C
Stangl,M            = : =            Riedel,W
Hickl,J             1 : 0             Reich,T
Vogt,L              0 : 1          Lentrodt,T
Mainka,R            1 : 0           Schmidt,G
---------------------------------------------
(19.0)            4.5 : 3.5            (17.0)


SV Castrop-Rauxel     -     Dresdener SC 1898
=============================================
Van der Sterren,P   = : =            Almasi,Z
Hoffmann,M          = : =             Teske,H
Watson,W            1 : 0             Lanka,S
Libeau,R            = : =           Uhlmann,W
Appel,R             0 : 1          Maiwald,JU
Dinstuhl,V          = : =            Boriss,M
Hennig,D            1 : 0          Goldberg,A
Hille,I             0 : 1          Andresen,S
---------------------------------------------
(19.5)            4.0 : 4.0            (16.5)


SG Bochum             -            SC Bamberg
=============================================
Glek,I              1 : 0            Pribyl,M
Piskov,Y            1 : 0            Pribyl,J
Schmittdiel,E       1 : 0          Meister,PJ
Sonntag,HH          0 : 1              Loew,G
Reschke,S           = : =          Kestler,HG
Kassebaum,R         1 : 0        Krauseneck,P
Ellers,H            1 : 0              Rupp,M
Kitte,S             = : =              Held,M
---------------------------------------------
(28.5)            6.0 : 2.0            ( 7.5)


Ranking after 13th round
=================================================
 1. SG Porz               26 :  0   71.5  (301.0)
 2. Solinger SG           23 :  3   74.5  (340.5)
 3. Dresdener SC 1898     19 :  7   62.0  (278.0)
 4. SV Empor Berlin       17 :  9   61.5  (272.0)
 5. PSV Duisburg          17 :  9   53.0  (247.0)
 6. Hamburger SK          16 : 10   56.5  (249.5)
 7. SG Bochum             15 : 11   51.5  (215.5)
 8. PSV/BSV Wuppertal     13 : 13   51.5  (231.5)
 9. SV Werder Bremen      13 : 13   50.0  (220.0)
10. SV Castrop-Rauxel     12 : 14   51.5  (225.0)
11. Delmenhorster SK       8 : 18   48.5  (223.5)
12. Muenchener SC 1836     8 : 18   45.5  (214.5)
13. SK Passau              8 : 18   43.0  (207.5)
14. SK Zaehringen          8 : 18   41.5  (202.0)
15. SV Tuebingen           3 : 23   35.5  (169.5)
16. SC Bamberg             2 : 24   34.5  (147.0)

8) 4NCL Round 8 results 17th March
-------------------------------

Slough			  6-2	Whitney
Northwest Eagles	  5-3	Bristol
BCM			4.5-3.5	Richmond
South Wales Dragons	  4-4	Hertford
Croydon			  6-2	Na Fianna
Midland Monarch's	  6-2	Guildford
Newcastle		  1-7	Wood Green


TABLE AFTER 8 ROUNDS
--------------------

Midland Monarch's	15
Slough			14
Whitney			12
Wood Green		11
Northwest Eagles	11
BCM			10
Hertford		 7
Richmond		 7
Croydon			 7
Guildford		 6
South Wales Dragons	 6
Na Fianna		 3
Bristol			 2
Newcastle		 1

The games in the Four Nations Chess League are rated by the
Welsh Chess Union although discussions with the British Chess
Federation continue. It seems that the dispute revolves around
the BCF trying to form their own league after the success that
Chris Dunworth has had. Perhaps the BCF ought to concentrate
on getting sponsorship for the British Championships before
over reaching themselves in this regard.

There will be a 2nd 4NCL Chess and Bridge International 9 rounds
(2 rounds per day 4-6 May and 11th May, 1 round followed by
speed event on the 12th May.

Entry 2400+ 60 quid, 2350-2395 65 quid, 2300-2345 + fm, wim, wfm 70 quid.
2250-2295 75 quid, 2200-2245 80 quid, below 2200 85 quid.
Details from Chris Dunworth Bunny Cottage, 5 Warren Road, Croyden
Surrey CRO 6PE [Tel 0181-656-0980] 36 player closed Swiss.


9) Groningen Chess Club Weekend Tournament by Anjo Anjewierden
-----------------------------------------------------------

The main chess-club in Groningen (NED) organised a weekend-tournament March
22-24.  It was a six-round Swiss with 2 GM's (Kovalev (UKR) and Ye
Rongguang (CHN), one female GM (Peng Zhaoqin (NED)) and a host of strong
local players.  Kovalev was never a contender for the first prize. He
relied too much on winning an equal endgame and drew in rounds 3, 4 and 5.

Ye Rongguang was defeated in the fifth round by Yge Visser (2380) in what
turned out to be the most exciting game of the tournament.  Some comments
based on the analysis by Visser: 25... Ka8 is probably a mistake, better is
25... Kc8.  27. Bh3! takes advantage of the back-rank mate pattern of
25... Ka8.  The position after 50. dxc5 is aesthetically pleasing as
White's triple c-pawns create a back-rank mate pattern on the a-file!  If
Black plays 50... Rg2 then there follows 51. Rb2! and Black must exchange
into a lost pawn endgame.

After the fifth round Visser and Eelke Wiersma (2285) where leading the
pack with 4,5 / 5 with Ye Rongguang and some others trailing by a half
point. In the sixth round Wiersma-Visser was a quick draw and Ye Rongguang
converted an equal endgame to a win against Kamstra (2325).  Ye Rongguang,
Visser and Wiersma tied for first with 5,0 / 6 with Ye Rongguang winning on
tie-break.
Below is the final table. Time-control was 1,45 / 40 + 15 minutes.

Many thanks to the tournament organisation for providing the games.

Ranking after round 6 of SC Groningen Weekendtoernooi 1996 -  Groep A
No.  PNo.  Name                       Score WP    SB     rat.  TPR
------------------------------------------------------------------
  1.    2  Ye Rongguang        g CHN   5.0  23.0  18.00  2475 2549
        4  Visser, Y           f NED   5.0  22.0  18.25  2380 2441
       10  Wiersma, E            NED   5.0  19.0  14.75  2285 2453
  4.    7  Van Wessel, R         NED   4.5  21.0  15.00  2325 2337
        3  Peng Zhaoqin       wg NED   4.5  21.0  14.25  2410 2359
       18  Clemens, A            NED   4.5  19.5  13.75  ---- 2390
       15  Van der Lijn, B       NED   4.5  19.5  13.50  2190 2311
  8.    6  Kamstra, C            NED   4.0  21.0  12.50  2325 2228
        5  Van der Weide, K    f NED   4.0  21.0  11.75  2345 2227
       16  Jansen, C             NED   4.0  18.5  11.00  ---- 2269
 11.    1  Kovalev, A          g BLR   3.5  23.5  12.50  2495 2298
       13  De Boer, Sy           NED   3.5  23.5  12.25  2250 2208
       14  Ernst, S              NED   3.5  22.5  10.75  2240 2273
       32  Cako, L               NED   3.5  21.5   9.00  ---- 2170
       24  Van der Meer, H       NED   3.5  21.0  10.25  ---- 2224
        9  Tondivar, B         f NED   3.5  19.5  10.50  2300 2109
       29  Van Pelt, A           NED   3.5  18.0   7.75  ---- 2164
        8  De Jong, M            NED   3.5  17.5   7.75  2310 2244
       11  Wagenmakers, EJ       NED   3.5  17.5   6.75  2280 2121
 20.   21  Polak, I              NED   3.0  21.0   7.50  ---- 2073
       20  Riksten, M            NED   3.0  19.0   8.25  ---- 2049
       22  Van Kooten, L         NED   3.0  18.0   7.75  ---- 2135
       33  Van Winkel, K         NED   3.0  18.0   7.50  ---- 2128
       17  Jongsma, W            NED   3.0  17.0   7.25  2175 2046
       12  Pel, B                NED   3.0  16.0   7.50  2255 2056
       44  Zuiderweg, E          NED   3.0  15.0   6.25  ---- 1938
 27.   23  Van Leeuwen, M        NED   2.5  19.0   5.25  ---- 2071
       25  Tilstra, A            NED   2.5  18.0   6.25  ---- 2076
       27  Alberts, C            NED   2.5  18.0   5.25  ---- 1913
       42  Schuil, J             NED   2.5  17.5   5.75  ---- 1989
       26  Van der Schilden, E   NED   2.5  16.5   4.25  ---- 1987
       19  Eppinga, R            NED   2.5  15.5   3.75  ---- 1918
       43  Friesen, B            NED   2.5  15.5   3.75  ---- 1863
       36  Westerkamp, B         NED   2.5  14.5   4.75  ---- 1874
 35.   30  Palmans, T            NED   2.0  16.5   3.00  ---- 1849
       40  Hovenga, A            NED   2.0  16.0   2.00  ---- 1925
       41  Karsdorp, N           NED   2.0  11.5   1.75  ---- 1834
 38.   38  Rubingh, R            NED   1.5  17.0   2.50  ---- 1777
       31  Potze, R              NED   1.5  14.5   1.50  ---- 1644
       37  Van der Vecht, L      NED   1.5  13.0   1.25  ---- 1607
       39  Steeneken, P          NED   1.5  12.5   2.00  ---- 1618
       35  Dam, T                NED   1.5  12.5   1.25  ---- 1628
 43.   34  De Boer, R            NED   1.0  13.5   0.25  ---- 1326
 44.   28  Lulof, J              NED   0.5  16.5   6.25  ---- 1668

10) Danish Championships 1996
--------------------------

Per Rasmussen sends games from the Danish Championships in
Randers Denmark. Henrik Danielsen leads after 7 of the 9
rounds and is on course for the GM title together with
previous norms.

The tournament runs from 30th March to 8th April 1996.

He is from Under Uret (the Danish Chess-BBS)
and has a www page which is however only in Danish:

http://dk-online.dk/users/Per_Rasmussen

Randers (DEN), III-IV 1996.                          cat. IX (2461)
-------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0
-------------------------------------------------------------------
 1 Danielsen, Henrik     m DEN 2485  * . 1 = . = 1 1 = 1  5.5  2677
 2 Nielsen, Peter Heine  g DEN 2495  . * = = = 1 = = . 1  4.5  2555
 3 Hoi, Carsten          m DEN 2435  0 = * 1 = . = . 1 =  4.0  2514
 4 Hansen, Lars Bo       g DEN 2565  = = 0 * 1 = . 0 1 .  3.5  2470
 5 Hansen, Sune Berg     m DEN 2495  . = = 0 * = . = = 1  3.5  2457
 6 Kristiansen, Jens     m DEN 2440  = 0 . = = * 1 = . =  3.5  2468
 7 Mortensen, Erling     m DEN 2430  0 = = . . 0 * 1 = 1  3.5  2445
 8 Schandorff, Lars      m DEN 2485  0 = . 1 = = 0 * 1 .  3.5  2480
 9 Borge, Nikolaj        m DEN 2455  = . 0 0 = . = 0 * 1  2.5  2358
10 Andreasen, Per          DEN 2325  0 0 = . 0 = 0 . 0 *  1.0  2153
-------------------------------------------------------------------

11) Yugometal Tournament Belgrade. Final Scores
-------------------------------------------

Sinisa Joksic sends me the full and correct results from this
event.

   +-------------------------+--------------------------------------+------+
   |  -    0                 |  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  0  1  2  |points|
   +-------------------------+--------------------------------------+------+
   |  1. Chiburdanidze,Maya  |  **  =  1  =  =  1  1  =  1  1  1  1 |  9   |
   |  2. Cramling,Pia        |  =  **  =  =  =  1  =  1  =  1  1  1 |  8   |
   |  3. Galliamova,Alisa    |  0  =  **  1  =  0  1  1  1  =  1  1 |  7.5 |
   |  4. Maric,Alisa         |  =  =  0  **  =  =  =  1  =  1  1  1 |  7   |
   |  5. Ioseliani,Nana      |  =  =  =  =  **  =  0  1  1  1  =  1 |  7   |
   |  6. Matveeva,Svetlana   |  0  0  1  =  =  **  1  0  1  1  =  1 |  6.5 |
   |  7. Bojkovic,Natasa     |  0  =  0  =  1  0  **  1  1  1  =  0 |  5.5 |
   |  8. Skripchenko,Almira  |  =  0  0  0  0  1  0  **  1  =  =  1 |  4.5 |
   |  9. Gaprindashvili,Nona |  0  =  0  =  0  0  0  0  **  1  1  1 |  4   |
   | 10. Gaponenko,Inna      |  0  0  =  0  0  0  0  =  0  **  =  1 |  2.5 |
   | 11. Peng,Zhaoqin        |  0  0  0  0  =  =  =  =  0  =  **  0 |  2.5 |
   | 12. Vuksanovic,Sanja    |  0  0  0  0  0  0  1  0  0  0  1  ** |  2   |
   +-------------------------+--------------------------------------+------+

12) AEGON Tournament
----------------

The 11th AEGON Computer Chess Tournament will be available on the
internet by TASC this year. (there is always a lot of demand
for the games and results) TASC send me the following press
release. The games will be at

http://www.aegon.nl/chess

on the internet.

PRESS RELEASE

Karpov at 11th AEGON Computer Chess Tournament

The 11th AEGON Computer Chess Tournament will take place from April 10th
to 17th. 50 chess players and 50 chess computers participate in the biggest
tournament of it's kind in the world. FIDE world champion Anatoly Karpov
and the top Dutch grand masters Jan Timman and Jeroen Piket open the
tournament on April 10th. At GMT 2.00 pm they each play two exhibition
matches against the world's best computer chess programs in their class.

Karpov competes against Fritz, the reigning world champion computer for all
categories. Timman plays against the PC world champion MChess Pro, and Piket
against the Dutch champion the King.

The live presentation of the matches is for the first time world-wide
technologically possible. For the first time ever, moves from players and
computers are shown on Internet entirely computerized, without human
interference. Each day, three matches are monitored live on Internet and
reports will be given on each round. The chessboards have built-in electronics,
which recognize the chess pieces and the moves. The moves are transferred to
a specially designed computernetwork, which, in turn, transforms the moves
automatically to Internet language (Html) and sent it to an Internet computer
(server). When an Internet user from anywhere in the world contacts this
Internet computer he is able to follow the matches live from The Hague on his
own computer. The matches can be monitored move by move. It is also possible
to replay the matches and to watch animated versions.

The Internet address is: http://www.aegon.nl/chess

The Internet site is multilingual: Dutch, English, German and Spanish.
-	Every day three live matches
-	Animations
-	All matches can be replayed move by move
-	PGN data of all matches
-	List of participants
-	Tournament program

The tournament will take place from Wednesday 10th trough Wednesday
17th April in the central hall of the AEGON headquarters in The Hague, The
Netherlands. The tournament will comprise six rounds and each round will
start at GMT 7.00 pm.


13) LATEST FIDE Developments
------------------------

Patrick Rasenberg sent me the fax he sent that the Dutch federation,
have decided to convene all European federations in the Netherlands.

To All European Chess Federations

Haarlem, 3 April 1996


Dear Sirs,

We hereby inform you that the Royal Dutch Chess Federation has
decided, after consultation with some other European
Chess Federations and Prof. Jungwirth, to organise a
meeting of the European Chess Federations.
The meeting will be held in the weekend of the 27th and
28th of April. The venue will be the Holiday Inn Hotel at
the railway station of Utrecht. For your information, Utrecht
is the 4th city of the Netherlands and the centre of the
Dutch railway-net. The distance between Utrecht and Amsterdam
is about 30 km. We will send to all European Chess Federations
the invitations, the registration forms and other details by
fax on the 9th or 10th of April. On the agenda of the meeting
will be FIDE's decision to grant the organisation of the match
for the World Championship to Iraq and other European issues.
We invite the European Chess Federations to send us, the organisers,
suggestions for the agenda before the 15th of april.

*What led to the decision of the Royal Dutch Chess Federation to
organise the European meeting*

The decision of the FIDE-leadership to grant the organisation
of the match for the World Championship between Anatoly Karpov
and Gata Kamsky to Iraq has led to fierce discussion within the
chess community. In reaction to this decision some European Chess
Federations are threatening to leave FIDE. A substantial number
of European Chess Federations have expressed their strong objections
against the match in Bagdad.
In her letter of the 18th of March 1996 the Royal Dutch Chess
Federation therefore requested the Continental President of
Europe, Prof. Kurt Jungwirth, to convene a special meeting of
the European Chess Federations to discuss the "Bagdad"-issue
and other matters concerning the European Continent.
This request of the Royal Dutch Chess Federation for a European
meeting has now been supported officially by at least 7 other
European Chess Federations and some other European Chess
Federations have stated that they will welcome such a meeting.
The Royal Dutch Chess Federation therefore contacted Prof.
Jungwirth on Friday the 29th of March about her request to
convene a meeting of the European Continent. Prof. Jungwirth's
position was, that he had no intention to convene such a meeting
(see the letter from Prof. Jungwirth on the 28th of March),
but also that he had no objection at all against the initiative
of the Royal Dutch Chess Federation to organise such a meeting.

Sincerely yours,
ROYAL DUTCH CHESS FEDERATION,


Herman Hamers
President


Gunther Loewenthal
FIDE-delegate


Another message was sent by Makarov to all Federations.
-------------------------


                     To All National Chess Federations

    Despite the   fact   that  the  greater  part  of  the  Chess
Federations  clearly  expressed  their  will  against  the  match
between  A.Karpov  and  G.Kamsky in Baghdad (Iraq) FIDE President
K.Iljumzhinov confirmed at the press-conference  in  Moscow  that
Baghdad will see that match and Mr.Saddam Hussein will open it.
    He said that different understanding of moral principles
is the  main  reason  why  there were objections of the large and
strong Chess Federations to the match.
    In that   situation   only  unity  of  action  of  the  Chess
Federations of all  the countries  could  make  FIDE's  authority
cancel its decision to hold the match.Otherwise it will simply
put FIDE and chess players to shame.
    In connection with that the Russian Chess Federation supports
any constructive proposals  to  determine the unified position
of the Chess Federations  regarding that match.
    If FIDE President  K.Iljumzhinov  does  not  listen  to  that
unified  opinion  the  Chess Federations will be forced to gather
and determine their unified attitude to that event.

          A.Makarov
          President of Russian Chess Federation

-----------------------------------

Finally the US Chess Federation seems to present facts that kill
off any prospect of the match in Iraq.

------------------------------------
Kirsan Iljumzhinov
President
c/o FIDE Secretariat
P.O. Box 166
CH-1000 Lausanne 4, Switzerland
011-41-21-329-1923         April 3, 1996

Mr. President:

As the president of the United States Chess Federation it is my duty to
inform you the U.S. Challenger for the World Championship title, Gata Kamsky
was denied permission to go to Baghdad, Iraq by the State and Treasury
Departments of the United States government.

As a permanent resident of the United States, Gata Kamsky is subject to the
provisions of the U.S. Iraqi Sanctions Regulations. Willful violations of
the sanctions are punishable upon conviction by a fine of up to $1,000,000
and imprisonment for up to 12 years. Furthermore, conviction under the
sanctions, or even playing in Iraq, could well adversely effect Mr. Kamsky's
immigration status in the United States.

Mr. Kamsky made a written request to the Treasury Department, Office of
Foreign Assets Control, for a license to play in Iraq. The request has been
firmly denied, leaving Mr. Kamsky fully subject to the sanctions regulations
and other risks. Clearly he cannot play in Iraq, an outcome that should have
been obviuous from the start. A more timely exposure and discussion of the
sites under consideration could have avoided this unfortunate controversy.

Putting aside the time wasted, the United States Chess Federation urges you,
again, to find a new site as quickly as possible. If FIDE cannot complete
its current World Championship promptly and within the statutes, it will
lose whatever credibility FIDE retains. In any event, it is wholly
inappropriate to begin planning a new cycle, $5,000,000 or not, before the
current cycle is responsibly completed.

We are most anxious to support your many new visions for international
chess, but cannot do so unless FIDE can bring the Kamsky-Karpov match to a
successful and appropriate conclusion.

(signed)
Denis J. Barry

14) Costa Rican National Chess Championships by Rodolfo Arias
---------------------------------------------------------

Costa Rica's national chess championship has   been organized every year,
without interruption, since 1936. So, we have just completed our 61th
edition. No so bad, I think!

Bernal Gonzalez, the only International Master (around 2425 in strength,
but sadly enough we are out of FIDE because we don't have any Government
support to pay our membership, and so we are out of the ELO list. I was,
myself, in the 2180 the last time we appeared) of the country, won at 22 his
fifth title. He is really a gifted player, with enormous potential and a
great knowledge of the Bird's, his pet opening. He ended with 14 out of 17
possible points in the 18 player round robin field.

Sergio Minero, also 22 years old, born in El Salvador, recently naturalized
Costarican, and the owner of two IM norms, camed second with 13.

Juan Leon Jimenez, the oldest at 43, and a well experienced master who
lived in Seattle from 1989 to 1995, where he came second to Orlov in three
succesive Washington state championships, ended third with 12.5

FINAL STANDINGS
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
1.  Gonzalez, Bernal 		m CRC 2380  12   .  .   M	14	/17
2.  Minero, Sergio 		f ESA 2405   0 21.02.74 M	13
3.  Jimenez, Juan Leon		  CRC 2240  12   .  .   M	12.5
4.  Valdes, Leonardo		  CRC 2180  14   .  .   M	12
    Hernandez, Francisco	  CRC 2230  15   .  .   M	12
6.  Murillo, Alexis 		f CRC 2365   0   .  .   M	11.5
7.  Charpentier, William 	f CRC 2300   2 05.03.60 M	10
    Bermudez, Sergio		  CRC 2220   0   .  .   M	10
9.  Minero, Carlos		  CRC 2195   0 20.11.72 M	 8.5
10. Ugalde, Ronald		  CRC 2200   0   .  .   M	 7.5
11. Rodriguez, Adrian		  CRC 2190   0   .  .   M	 7
12. Arias, Rodolfo		  CRC 2180   0   .  .   M	 6	/13
13. Barrantes			  CRC				 5.5
    Solano, Agustin		  CRC 2175   0   .  .   M	 5.5
    Ruiz							 5.5
16. Vargas							 4
17. L. Soto							 3.5
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
[Note, I am missing one name. The ratings are all June 1995 except for
Sergio Minero's who is still in the rating list under El Salvador. MC]

15) PCA "Kremlin Stars-96" INVITATION
---------------------------------

The following was sent by:
Eugeni K. Grigorian" 
about the PCA Rapidplay Grand Prix this year:

     To All National Chess Federations

    The Russian Chess Federation,the National Fund of Sports of
Russia and the Professional Chess Association hold the International
Tournament "Kremlin Stars-96" in Moscow, in the State Kremlin Palace
from 25 to 30 April, 1996.

    1. Qualifier Tournament.

    Chess players  with  FIDE rating 2525 and higher (on 1.01.96)
are invited to  participate in the Qualifier Tournament.
    ˇhess players with  FIDE  rating  2450  -  2520,who  want  to
participate in the event should pay entry fee 400.000 rubles,
about $80 (Grandmasters of Russia - 100.000 rubles)
    The Tournament is held  according  to  the  Swiss  system,
11 rounds with the time control of 25 minutes for the whole game.

    Program:
    25.04.95 - 10.00-11.30  - registration of participants
               11.30-20.00  - 1-6 rounds
    26.04.95 - 11.30-19.00  - 7-11 rounds

    The first six  placed  participants  qualify  for  the  Final
Tournament.
    Every participant  taking  7-12  places  wins  money  prize
(4.800 000 roubles).
    The participants of the Qualifier Tournaments bear all their
travelling, accomodation and meal expenses.
    The prices in Hotel Cosmos (without breakfast) are
as follows:
  - in a double room about $50 person daily;
  - in a single room about $100 person daily.

    3. The Final Tournament.

    10 personally  chessplayers  and  6  winners of the Qualifier
Tournament will play  for  the  main  prizes  in  the  Tournament
(160.000 USD)  from  27  to  30  April,  1996  according  to  the
Knock-out system.
    The Organizing Committee provides  the  participants  of  the
Final Tournament with accomodation,meals and travelling(Aeroflot,
a return ticket,business class from the country of permanent
resedence,expenses
from 12:00 26.04.95 to 12:00 01.05.95.

    Entries for the participation in  the Qualifier Tournaments,
please, send at:   - fax: (7-095) 291.97.55
                   - tel: (7-095) 291.97.55 or 290.64.66

   Best wishes   A.Makarov
                 President of Russian Chess Federation


16) Internation Chess Open Doctor. Geraldo J. R. Alckmin
----------------------------------------------------

Contact :cjunior@iconet.com.br (Celestino Carvalho Junior)

DATE: 26/28 APRIL 1996

PLACE: GINASIO DE ESPORTES TOBIAS SALGADO
       ASSOCIA

CITY: PINDAMONHANGABA ( 70 miles from SFo Paulo )
STATE: SGO PAULO
COUNTRY : BRAZIL

GAME: ( 9R, SWISS, 21 minutes/K.0) non-FIDE rated

INFORMATION: FAX: +55-12-242-1944 Mr. Amaury
             Phone:55-12-242-4737 Mr. Josino

Premiation: 1' $ 1500,00
            2' $  900,00
            3' $  700,00
            4' $  500,00
        5'/10' $  100,00
       11'/10' $   90,00

We have acomodation for a lot of people - free ( no cost !!! )
We have confirmation of participation of:
G.M.I. GILBERTO MILOS
G.M.I. SUNYE NETO
M.I.   GIOVANI VESCOVI
M.I.   RAFAEL LEITAO
M.I.   DARCY LIMA
M.I.   EVERALDO MATSURA
M.I.   HERMANN CLAUDIUS VAN RIEDMISKY
M.I.   HELDER CAMARA
M.I.   ALEXANDRE SEGAL
M.I.   CHRISTIAN TOTH
GABRIEL MIGUEL CHAMPIONSHIP (CHILDREN UNDER 12 YEARS)
TATIANA RATCU AND BARBARA FARHAT ( CHAMPIONSHIP UNDER 14YEARS )

PRESIDEND EVENT MR. EDUARDO SAN MARTIN
COORDENATION - JOSINO REZENDE

=============================================
Homepage: http://www.iconet.com.br/doctor
=============================================
e-mail: cjunior@iconet.com.br
=============================================
Celestino C. Junior
Cotton-Net BBS +55-123-41-1749 V34+ 24hs on-line
Fidonet 4:801/59
=============================================


17) Rustavi Chess School
 --------------------

I was asked to put this in TWIC by Dan Luke. He says any interest should
go to  I have put it in TWIC because it is interesting
you will have to make your minds up about it. (MC)


        Chess in Georgia  is a part of national culture. Everyone played
chess according to  tradition - from king to ordinary citizen. It's known
that a dowry list always included chess, together with Shota Rustaveli poem
"Knight in the Panther's Skin". Such popularity caused foundation of a
strong chess school, introducing Georgia to the world together with the
strongest chess countries . Despite officialy used term "The Soviet chess
school"  during the USSR period, the Georgian chess school existed and
developed and this is convincingly expressed by the following facts:
>>18 grand masters;
>>25-30% Georgian masters of ex-combined team;
>> about 20 world and Europe champions.
        Chess development was the most important part of  the Government
sport policy.  In the 60-ies Viktor Goglidze created the first USSR
specialized chess school in Georgia. Chess schools were open almost in
every city. This was the foundation for many Georgian masters and grand
masters.
        In 1995 Edward Shevardnadze signed a special decree  about chess
development in Georgia. The decree demonstrated the Government"s
traditional respect of chess culture. According to the decree all
Governmental and state structures, governors and mayors are responsible to
assist chess development. And they realize the decree as well as they can.
But for financial reasons, their assistance  is expressed by moral support.

        In 1991, all of the chess schools were closed in Georgia, because
of economic  problems. Their buildings were occupied by political parties
and different commercial enterprises.  Many teachers and trainers left
Georgia. Most of the people staying here have to live a poor existence.
Georgian chess school was in danger of disappearing.
        In 1994, 6 chess players recreated chess federation of the Kvemo
Kartli region. The first step of this social organization became opening of
first children chess school in Rustavi.
        Rustavi Municipality allocated a building for the school (120 sq.
meters) that we repaired with our own hands. A year has already passed
since 90 children of 4 year old age were trained. A lot of people turned
out wishing to be trained. So we had to open two more affiliates. But poor
material base, absence of necessary inventory, and simple comfort - as for
example heating, do not allow us to carry out  high qualified training.
Now, Kvemo Kartli governor is considering allocating an old Kindergarden
building to the Rustavi chess school.
        Despite the necessity of repairing the building,  we are confident,
that we'll have enough power and energy to create a new chess school for
all children dreaming of playing chess, in the next two and a half years.
        Children chess school - is not the only result of Kvemo Kartli
chess federation work. Because of chess popularity we issue a weekly
newspaper  - the only periodical in Georgia, devoted to chess. We have no
Publishing base, so the newspaper is issued as an attachment to the
newspaper "Kvemo Kartli"
        The school has a special library including generally separate
volumes and chess federation guidance manuals. The Russian chess club helps
us in completing the library with the newest periodicals and books issued
in Russia.
With the assistance of Kvemo Kartlli chess federation,  other regional
chess federations were created in Marneuli, Bolnisi and Tsalka, tetri
Tskaro and dmanisi. Local administrators have allocated  places for
children chess schools in each of these regions.
        In spring of 1995 the Regional tournament was held in Rustavi. This
is not the only competition, carried out under Kvemo Kartli federation
aegis. In 1994-95 16  tournaments took place in Rustavi, also 8 selection
championships of Georgia for different age children.
In December 1995, "Kvemo Kartli" team gained first cup of Georgia in chess
and moved up to Europe selection championship.
        Our federation proposes stressing children chess school development.
Today 90 4-year old children are trained. The pupils have classes in three
turns. The school has not got enough inventory. 16 chess sets, 12 chess
tables, 11 clocks and 3 demonstrating blackboards - this is all that we own
for today. We have no opportunity to use the newest technical achievements
of chess education. Because of limited facilities, we cannot  receive all
the people who wish to be trained . In support of children's interest in
chess, we are preparing a TV version of chess club. Free telecasts of this
program will be presented to nongovernmental TV company "Rustavi-2" the
first telecast is to be broadcasted in August 1996.
        TV training cannot change real communication of a teacher and
pupil.  A trainer can only spot the talented children at a chess desk, and
help them develop their abilities. We want to focus our energy on
developing Rustavi children chess school.
        But we need material support.


Project Description

Allocated equipment and cash we shall use in the following way.
        8 new classes will be open at the school, 10 people can be trained
at each of them three times a week in one turn. In this way, 300 additional
children will be able to be trained.
        Groups of pupils are divided according to knowledge level.

        Apart from the training classes, two halls are outfitted,  for 50
pupils, and original training using chess playing computers.

        The library will subscribe to special periodicals:
                The Chess Review "64" (Russia)
                The Chess  Reporter (Yugoslavia)
                The  Chess News (Great Britain)
                The Chess Encyclopedia (Yugoslavia)
                The Chess List
                The Chess herald

We propose to carry out three official tournaments per year for every age
category of pupil. Georgian Prominent chess players will observe students
at the school and select students for tournaments.

A Methodical Center will be created at the school  for increasing trainers
qualification,  equipped with a professional chess computer  and connected
to the "Internet",  we will access worldwide chess information. Training
seminars will take place for teachers conducted by Georgian and Russian
prominent chess players. The main task of  the Methodical Center is to
prepare teachers for working at chess college and high school.

Chess newspaper  "Chess", being issued now as an attachment to the regional
newspaper  "Kvemo Kartli" will be out twice a month as an independent
issue.

Expected Results
        Chess development will allow us to satisfy all the children and
adults of Kvemo Kartli, wishing to play chess. The pupils will  be
specially prepared using the latest chess methods and  the newest training
equipment. In parallel with the cultural development, a new chess elite
will  be created. This will help our traditions survive. Having a strong
chess center in Rustavi, we shall be able to improve regional works.
        In this way, chess education will move up to a new step - creating
of special college and  high school. Chess school development will provide
some help for social problems, giving children a positve alternative and
adults a meaningful way to interact with them, helping a new generation
develop its  intellectual potential.

Methods for carrying out this mission
        Equipping  school with special training equipment and inventory:
chess sets, chess tables, magnet wall blackboards, chess computer with
programs.
Completion of the library with training aid special literature and
subscribed issues.
        Connecting to the Internet  for the acquisition of chess
information. This will give chance to pupils and trainers to get the newest
information about the chess world.
        Carrying out seminars  (twice a year) for the school teachers
inviting prominent chess players from Georgia and Russia. This will provide
the teachers with regular improvement of qualification and level.
        Holding selections (twice a year) for the pupils, inviting
prominent  Georgian chess masters.
        Holding children and adult tournaments (including international
ones) at the school.
        Issuing weekly chess newspaper.
        Preparing weekly chess TV program at nongovernmental TV station
"Rustavi-2"
        Opening affiliate schools in the central regions of Kvemo Kartli.

Specification                                           quantity
Chess set (desk and figures)                            60
Chess clocks                                            40
Chess tables                                            60
Chairs                                                  120
Chess literature
        -books
        -periodicals
Chess game computers                                    8
Chess professional computer with programs               1
Computer IBM PC 586                                     1
Printer Laser Jet 5P/2mb. 600dpi                        1
Fax                                                             1
Xerox                                                   1
Telephone                                                       2
Internet
Kerosene heater                                         8
Generator                                                       1
APC                                                             1
Office staffs
        - printer cartridge                                     1
        -Xerox cartridge                                        1
        -plugs                                          10
        -AC power strips                                        3
        -paper
Pens, copy-books, special chess note books              300
Funding of two seminars for trainers                    $2100
Funding of two seminars for pupils                      $2100
Newspaper issue funding
Transporting expenses.