Chess24 Sopiko Scotch

FIDE World Chess Championship Candidates London 2013 (11)

Carlsen retains lead, Aronian loses, Kramnik moves 2nd in London Candidates Round 11

Kramnik has momentum going into the final rounds. Photo © Ray Morris-Hill.

Kramnik has momentum going into the final rounds. Photo © Ray Morris-Hill. | http://www.rmhphoto.eu

The FIDE Candidates tournament in London is entering a final phase with Magnus Carlsen having a half point lead over Vladimir Kramnik after Levon Aronian lost to Peter Svidler after 11 of 14 rounds. This event is a very long and stressful one and today there were distinct signs that the players are getting very tired.

Alexander Grischuk played the quite crude 5.h4 against Carlsen's Gruenfeld. This line had been previously tried by Alexander Morozevich in a rapid and blitz tournament against Giri. Carlsen's reaction looked tentative and didn't have his usual sureness of touch. Carlsen also gave a horribly flawed line 10. Ne5 (Grischuk wanted to play this and worked hard on it before rejecting it) Bxe5 11.dxe5 gxh5!? 12.Qxh5 Nd7? (Carlsen's suggestion which loses quickly maybe he would have played 12...Bg6 when he got there but as Grischuk said, this entire line is very risky for black) 13.Bd3 Bxd3 14.e4!! Although Grischuk couldn't exploit it Carlsen's 12...e5 also looked poor. In the end they repeated in a position where Carlsen certainly couldn't press for a win in Grischuk's time trouble.

Worse still was what Levon Aronian did. Peter Svidler played the Saemisch variation of the Nimzo-Indian and got a space advantage and a small edge. Aronian suddenly cooked up 22...g5? a move that any chess player would automatically feel should be bad. It did have its point but it was still a horrible move. Svidler spent a long time trying to refute the move with 23.c6 which in fact isn't the best move, 23.Qe1 heading for the broken kingside is, and Svidler couldn't make it work against 23...Nd5 but such was the strong impression that g5 was bad he didn't look elsewhere and assumed he would eventually find something. Aronian had missed 23.c6, didn't look in detail at 23...Nd5 and went really berzerk with 23...b5?? after getting annoyed with himself for missing 23.c6. Now Svidler really was winning and won quickly.

Vladimir Kramnik moved into second place with a fairly typical positional grind against out of form Teimour Radjabov. Kramnik caught out Radjabov in an old line of the King's Indian getting a better position and extra hour. Rajdabov was one move away from a draw in spite of being in time trouble. 28...Rc7, instead he fell into quite a well disguised trap with 28...Qxa2. Kramnik really is in the mix now and faces Aronian with black but the Armenian could seriously be playing win or bust tomorrow.

Ivanchuk vs Gelfand was an interesting line which ended in a quick draw by repetition. Ivanchuk said that he would be using the rest of the event as preparation for the Russian Team Championships that follow. I'm not impressed with that attitude.

R11 Standings: Carlsen 7.5, Kramnik 7, Aronian 6.5, Svidler 5.5, Grischuk, Gelfand 5, Ivanchuk 4, Radjabov 3.5

R12 Fri 29th Mar 2pm Carlsen-Ivanchuk, Gelfand-Svidler, Aronian-Kramnik, Radjabov-Grischuk. I'm on ICC with David Smerdon. What a day!

Svidler-Aronian

Svidler-Aronian

Svidler-Aronian. Photo © Ray Morris-Hill http://raymorris-hill.smugmug.com/.

Svidler,Peter (2747) - Aronian,Levon (2809) [E26]
FIDE Candidates London ENG (11.1), 28.03.2013

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.a3 Bxc3+ 5.bxc3 c5 6.e3 Qa5 7.Bd2 Ne4 8.Bd3 Nxd2 9.Qxd2 d6 10.f4

[10.Nf3 cxd4 11.cxd4 Nc6 12.Qxa5 Nxa5 13.Nd2 Bd7 14.Ke2 Ke7 15.Rhc1 Rac8 16.Rc3 Ba4 17.Rac1 b6 18.h4 h6 19.Ne4 f5 20.Ng3 Bd7 21.d5 Rhf8 22.dxe6 Bxe6 23.Nh5 g5 24.hxg5 hxg5 25.f4 g4 26.Ng3 Rf7 27.Kf2 Rh8 28.Ne2 Nb7 29.Nd4 Nc5 30.Ra1 1/2-1/2 Porper,E (2469)-Romanishin,O (2552)/Gausdal NOR 2006/The Week in Chess 599]

10...Nd7 11.Nf3 f5

[11...Nb6 12.e4 Bd7 13.0-0 cxd4 14.cxd4 Qxd2 15.Nxd2 e5 16.fxe5 dxe5 17.c5 Na4 18.Nc4 f6 19.dxe5 Nxc5 20.exf6 gxf6 21.Be2 0-0 22.e5 fxe5 1/2-1/2 Polgar,Z (2430)-Lombardy,W (2500)/New York 1985/EXT 2000]

12.e4 fxe4 13.Bxe4 Nf6 14.Bc2 Bd7 15.0-0 cxd4

Levon Aronian

r___k__r
pp_b__pp
___ppn__
q_______
__Pp_P__
P_P__N__
__BQ__PP
R____RK_

Peter Svidler

Position after 15...cxd5

"15....cxd4 is also very logical, if I take with the pawn it's just equal. I don't think I'm worse but I'm definitely not better in that endgame." - Svidler.

16.Qxd4 0-0

[16...Qc5 17.Qxc5 dxc5 18.Ne5 and white may be slightly better.]

17.Qxd6

"I'm never worse here but I'm not sure I have that much." - Svidler.

17...Qxc3 18.Bd3

Levon Aronian

r____rk_
pp_b__pp
___Qpn__
________
__P__P__
P_qB_N__
______PP
R____RK_

Peter Svidler

Position after 18.Bd3

"I chose a somewhat safer approach 18.Bd3 cutting the queen off from e3." - Svidler.

[18.Rac1 Qe3+ 19.Kh1 Rad8 "and it becomes a bit sharp and I wasn't quite sure what is going on." - Svidler and indeed it seems black is pretty much equal.]

18...Rad8 19.Rac1 Qa5

[19...Ne4 "There was a funny move Ne4 here but it doesn't really change very much but I just wanted to point it out." - Svidler. 20.Rxc3 Nxd6 21.c5 Ne8]

20.Ne5 Bc8 21.Qb4 Qc7?!

"Actually Qc7 was only connected to the g5 try. I'm ashamed to admit." - Aronian.

["I'm optically slightly better but I think in general it should be around equal and one way to equalise on the spot is 21.Qxb4" 21...Qxb4 22.axb4 Nd7 23.Be4 Nxe5 24.fxe5 "In general the Bc8 is such a passive piece I will be playing for a win but black gets a lot of stuff in." - Svidler. 24...Rxf1+ 25.Kxf1 Rd4 26.Bf3 Kf7 27.Ke2 Rd7 28.b5 could be nasty.]

22.c5

Levon Aronian

__br_rk_
ppq___pp
____pn__
__P_N___
_Q___P__
P__B____
______PP
__R__RK_

Peter Svidler

Position after 22.c5

22...g5?

Levon Aronian

__br_rk_
ppq____p
____pn__
__P_N_p_
_Q___P__
P__B____
______PP
__R__RK_

Peter Svidler

Position after 22...g5

"I feel I'm slightly better here but if I am it's very, very slightly and then I saw g5 and I thought this is kind of uncalled for and after this black's position just collapses." - Svidler. Question to Aronian. "So there's nothing wrong with this g5 move." - Aronian "Except that it loses."

[22...g6 "I quite like my position but black should be quite fine as well." - Svidler.; 22...Nd5 23.Qe4 g6 doesn't seem that bad.]

23.c6!?

Levon Aronian

__br_rk_
ppq____p
__P_pn__
____N_p_
_Q___P__
P__B____
______PP
__R__RK_

Peter Svidler

Position after 23.c6

"I just blundered c6 and I got frustrated. Otherwise there is nothing wrong with g5 it's just after c6, like in the game with Gelfand I made a tactical blunder and I think after c6 it's beyond repair but I should have tried something better than b5." - Aronian. Thing is he isn't even worse after c6 as Svidler's attempts to prove something in the main lines he calculated showed.

[23.Qe1! and somehow white must be quite seriously better. 23...Nh5 24.fxg5 Rxf1+ 25.Bxf1 Rd5 26.Nd3 Rxg5 27.g3 Nf6 28.Qe3 Rd5 29.Nf4 Re5 30.Qd4]

23...b5??

Levon Aronian

__br_rk_
p_q____p
__P_pn__
_p__N_p_
_Q___P__
P__B____
______PP
__R__RK_

Peter Svidler

Position after 23...b5

Aronian completely goes berzerk. Now he lashes out and really is gone.

[23...Nd5 And whilst Svidler assumed black's position was collapsing it really doesn't seem all that clear. 24.cxb7 Qxb7 25.Qxb7 Bxb7 and Houdini has this as pretty much equal. 26.fxg5 Nf4 "This is a tricky try and perhaps a decent practical try." - Svidler who got the variation right. It seems black is absolutely fine here. 27.Rcd1 (27.Rc7? loses for white.) 27...Rd5 equal.]

24.Qe1!?

[24.Qb2]]

24...Rd5 25.Qg3 h6 26.fxg5 Qxe5 27.Qxe5

Levon Aronian

__b__rk_
p_______
__P_pn_p
_p_rQ_P_
________
P__B____
______PP
__R__RK_

Peter Svidler

Position after 27.Qxe5

Svidler thinks the endgame is completely winning for white but black can't really avoid the exchange otherwise he gets mated. "I can definitely say I got a bit lucky today." - Svidler.

27...Rxe5 28.gxf6 Kf7 29.Rf4 Rd8 30.Be4 Rd2 31.h4 a5 32.Rc3 Re2 33.Bg6+ Kf8 34.Rd4 Rd5 35.Rxd5 exd5 36.Rc5 Re1+ 37.Kh2 Rf1 38.f7 b4 39.axb4 axb4 40.Rxd5 Kg7 41.Rd8 1-0

Grischuk-Carlsen

Magnus Carlsen

Magnus Carlsen. Photo © Ray Morris-Hill http://raymorris-hill.smugmug.com/.

Grischuk,Alexander (2764) - Carlsen,Magnus (2872) [D90]
FIDE Candidates London ENG (11.3), 28.03.2013

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Nf3 Bg7 5.h4!? c6

"In general c6 shouldn't lose. I also looked a little bit at some sharper alternatives, I couldn't remember them so it made no sense for me to do that." - Carlsen.

[5...dxc4 1-0 Morozevich,A (2748)-Giri,A (2720)/Beijing CHN 2012/The Week in Chess 945 (31)]

6.Bg5

A new or rare move according to Grischuk.

[6.cxd5 1-0 Morozevich,A (2748)-Giri,A (2720)/Beijing CHN 2012/The Week in Chess 946 (49)]

6...0-0

[6...Ne4 Has been played before.]

7.Bxf6

[7.e3?! Nh5 8.g3 Bg4 (8...h6) ]

7...Bxf6 8.h5

Magnus Carlsen

rnbq_rk_
pp__pp_p
__p__bp_
___p___P
__PP____
__N__N__
PP__PPP_
R__QKB_R

Alexander Grischuk

Position after 8.h5

8...Bf5!?

"A very original move." - Grischuk.

9.e3 e6 10.hxg6

[10.Ne5 "I spent a lot of time trying to trap this [f5] bishop." - Grischuk. 10...Bxe5 11.dxe5 gxh5!? was Carlsen's intention which Grischuk thought was risky. (11...Qb6 was what put Grischuk off the move. 12.Qd2 Nd7 which indeed looks level. 13.e4 dxe4 is good for black.) 12.Qxh5 Nd7? Carlsen suggested this which loses. (12...Bg6 has to be tried and maybe white has a little something. Surely Carlsen would have played this if he got here. 13.Qh3 Nd7 14.f4 Nc5 15.g4 f5 16.0-0-0) 13.Bd3 Bxd3 14.e4!]]

10...Bxg6 11.Bd3 Nd7 12.Qe2

Magnus Carlsen

r__q_rk_
pp_n_p_p
__p_pbb_
___p____
__PP____
__NBPN__
PP__QPP_
R___K__R

Alexander Grischuk

Position after 12.Qe2

12...e5?!

"It's completely unnecessary. After any move, 12...a6, 12...Qe7 black is absolutely fine." - Carlsen. "He played 12...e5 which is not a very good move and after that I somehow should be better but I could not find, in the end I just have to repeat." - Grischuk.

[12...a6]

13.Bxg6 hxg6 14.dxe5 Nxe5 15.cxd5 cxd5 16.Rd1 Qa5 17.Kf1

[17.Rxd5 Nxf3+ 18.Kf1 Nh2+ Grischuk equal. (18...Nd2+ Houdini completely equal. 19.Qxd2 Rad8!) 19.Rxh2 Qc7 20.g3 Rad8 21.Qd3]

17...Rad8 18.Nd4 Qc5 19.Nb3 Qc6 20.Na5 Qc7 21.Nb3 Qc6

Magnus Carlsen

___r_rk_
pp___p__
__q__bp_
___pn___
________
_NN_P___
PP__QPP_
___R_K_R

Alexander Grischuk

Position after 23...Qc6

"Only black can be better." - Grischuk.

22.Na5 Qc7 23.Nb3 Qc6

"At the end I simply have no way of saving the d-pawn and playing on. If there was I might have because in general I have more useful moves but the d-pawn is falling so there's nothing I can do." - Carlsen.

[23...Qc4 24.Na5 Qxe2+ 25.Kxe2 b6 (25...d4) 26.Nxd5]

1/2-1/2

Kramnik-Radjabov

Teimour Radjabov

Teimour Radjabov. Photo © Ray Morris-Hill http://raymorris-hill.smugmug.com/.

Kramnik,Vladimir (2810) - Radjabov,Teimour (2793) [E60]
FIDE Candidates London ENG (11.4), 28.03.2013

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.g3 c5 4.Nf3 Bg7 5.Bg2 cxd4 6.Nxd4 0-0 7.Nc3 Qc7 8.b3 d5 9.Ndb5 Qa5 10.Bd2 dxc4 11.bxc4 Qd8 12.0-0 a6 13.Na3 Bf5 14.Nc2 Nc6 15.Ne3

Teimour Radjabov

r__q_rk_
_p__ppbp
p_n__np_
_____b__
__P_____
__N_N_P_
P__BPPBP
R__Q_RK_

Vladimir Kramnik

Position after 15.Ne3

15...Qd7

"Supposed to be harmless because of 15...Qd4." - Kramnik. Radjabov is caught out by an old and rare line which has nevertheless been played by Gelfand and Aronian. Kramnik ended up with 1 hour more on the clock and a nice position.

[15...Qd4! 16.Rc1 Be4 (16...Rad8 17.Nxf5 gxf5 18.Nd5 Ne4 19.Be3 Qxd1 20.Rfxd1 e6 21.Bxe4 fxe4 22.Nb6 Rxd1+ 23.Rxd1 Rd8 24.Rb1 Bd4 25.Bxd4 Rxd4 26.Rb2 Kg7 27.c5 Rb4 28.Rd2 Rb1+ 29.Kg2 Rc1 30.Nd7 f5 31.Rb2 Na5 32.Rb6 Rc2 33.Kf1 Kf7 34.c6 Nxc6 35.Rxb7 Nd4 36.f4 Nxe2 37.Ne5+ Ke8 38.Rxh7 Rxa2 39.Nc6 Kf8 40.Ra7 Nc3 41.Ra8+ Kg7 42.Ra7+ Kh6 43.Ne5 e3 44.Nf7+ Kg7 45.Ne5+ Kf8 46.Ra8+ Ke7 47.Ra7+ Kd6 48.Rd7+ Kc5 49.Rc7+ Kb4 50.Nd3+ Kb5 51.Rxc3 Rd2 52.h4 a5 53.Nc1 Rd1+ 54.Ke2 Rg1 55.Kxe3 Rxg3+ 56.Kd4 Rg4 57.Nd3 Rxh4 58.Rc5+ Kb6 59.Re5 a4 60.Rxe6+ Kb5 61.Re5+ Kb6 62.Kc4 Rh3 63.Rb5+ Kc6 64.Ra5 Re3 65.Ra6+ Kc7 66.Rxa4 Re4+ 67.Kb3 Rxa4 68.Kxa4 Kd6 69.Kb4 Kd5 70.Kc3 Ke4 71.Kc4 Ke3 72.Kd5 1-0 Gelfand,B (2700)-Sokolov,I (2665)/Wijk aan Zee 1996/CBM 051) 17.Nxe4 Nxe4 18.Be1 Nc5 19.Bxc6 bxc6 20.Qxd4 Bxd4 21.Nc2 Bf6 22.Ba5 Rab8 23.Rb1 Rb7 24.Rxb7 Nxb7 25.Bb6 c5 26.Ne3 Bd4 27.Nd5 e6 28.e3 Be5 29.Ne7+ Kg7 30.Rd1 Bd6 31.Nc6 Rc8 32.Nd8 Nxd8 33.Rxd6 Rc6 34.Rxc6 Nxc6 35.Bxc5 Kf6 36.Bb6 Ke5 37.f3 Kd6 38.f4 Nb4 39.a4 Nd3 40.Bd4 Nc5 41.Kf2 Nxa4 42.e4 Nc5 43.Ke3 f5 44.exf5 exf5 45.Bc3 Ne6 46.Kd3 Nc5+ 47.Ke3 Ne6 48.Kd3 Kc5 49.Ba5 h5 50.Bd2 Kc6 51.Be3 Kd6 52.Bd2 Nc5+ 53.Ke3 Kc6 54.Ba5 Ne6 55.Bd2 Nc5 56.Ba5 Ne6 57.Bd2 1/2-1/2 Aronian,L (2675)-Nataf,I (2565)/Calvia ESP 2004/The Week in Chess 521]

16.Nxf5 Qxf5 17.Rb1 Rad8 18.Qc1

[18.Rxb7 "I completely miscalculated even here already. So that was the first sign of...." - Rajdabov. 18...Na5 19.Rb4 Qc5 "But I thought black had a lot of play here and if I remember well computer wasn't taking on b7." - Kramnik who wasn't that convinced Qc5 was the best here anyway. 20.Nd5 Nxc4 21.Qc2 Nxd5 22.Rxc4 Qd6]

18...Qe6

[18...Rd7 19.Be3 (19.Nd5 Ne4; 19.h3 "It's not much for white." - Kramnik.) 19...Ng4]

19.Re1

Teimour Radjabov

___r_rk_
_p__ppbp
p_n_qnp_
________
__P_____
__N___P_
P__BPPBP
_RQ_R_K_

Vladimir Kramnik

Position after 19.Re1

Kramnik thought this was a good try as he doesn't have much here. Now having ruled out Nd4 he can play Nd5 next move.

[19.Rxb7 Na5 20.Rc7 Nxc4 21.Bf4 (21.Rc6 Rd6) 21...Rc8; 19.e3 Ne5 20.Nd5 Nxd5 21.cxd5 Rxd5]]

19...Qxc4

Kramnik very much wanted this capture rather than the Nc6 ending up here.

20.Rxb7 Ne5

[20...Nd4 21.Rxe7 A bit tricky but Kramnik thinks he can grab here.(21.e3 was a safer alternative. 21...Nf5 22.e4 Nd4 23.e5?! (23.h3) 23...Ng4 24.Nd5? loses.) ]

21.Bf4

[21.Rxe7 Qc5 22.Rb7 concerned Kramnik during the game but it seems he can get away with it.]

21...Qe6 22.h3

[22.Qe3 Nfg4 23.Qe4 f5? (23...Nxf2! 24.Kxf2 Ng4+ 25.Kg1 Bxc3 26.Qxe6 fxe6 and black is better.) 24.Qd5 wins for white.]

22...Nc4 23.e4

[23.Bg5 Kramnik wanted to play this but it doesn't seem to amount to much. 23...Rc8 (23...Nd6) 24.Bxf6 Bxf6 25.Nd5 Nd6]

23...Ne5 24.Bxe5 Qxe5 25.Nd5 Rfe8

[25...Rde8 Kramnik but it fails: 26.Nb4]]

26.Nb4

Teimour Radjabov

___rr_k_
_R__ppbp
p____np_
____q___
_N__P___
______PP
P____PB_
__Q_R_K_

Vladimir Kramnik

Position after 26.Nb4

Kramnik decided to play e4 because "this Nb4 looks terribly scarey."

26...Rd7

[26...Rc8 27.Nc6 Qe6 28.e5 Nd7 29.f4 "It's very dangerous to put it mildly." Kramnik. (29.Bd5 Qxd5 30.Nxe7+ Rxe7 31.Qxc8+ Bf8 32.Rc1 was a line Kramnik rejected and indeed it seems better for black. 32...Kg7) ]

27.Nc6

[27.Rxd7 Nxd7 28.Nxa6 Qa5 is equal.]

27...Qe6

"This trick in the game I saw, it's a very nice trap, very easy to fall into in time trouble but of course I was calculating Rc7 a lot." - Kramnik,

28.Rb6

Teimour Radjabov

____r_k_
___rppbp
pRN_qnp_
________
____P___
______PP
P____PB_
__Q_R_K_

Vladimir Kramnik

Position after 28.Rb6

28...Qxa2?

In time trouble Radjabov just loses.

[28...Rc7! "Call it a draw probably." - Kramnik. 29.Rxa6 Nd7 (29...Qc8 30.Qc4 Nd7 31.Rc1 is better for white. (31.Qb5 Nc5! is equal.) ) 30.e5 Nb8 (30...Rec8? 31.Bd5!) 31.Rb6 Nd7 32.Rb3 Nb8 33.Rc3 Qxa2 34.Nb4 Rxc3 35.Qxc3 Qa5 is control.]

29.e5!

Teimour Radjabov

____r_k_
___rppbp
pRN__np_
____P___
________
______PP
q____PB_
__Q_R_K_

Vladimir Kramnik

Position after 29.e5

The trap shuts and Rajdabov will lose. A beautiful piece of calculation from Kramnik.

29...Nd5

[29...Nh5 "In fact there is no square for the knight." - Kramnik. 30.Rb2 Qe6 31.g4]

30.Rb2 Qa4 31.Bxd5 Rxd5 32.Rb4 Qa2 33.Nxe7+ Kh8 34.Nxd5 Qxd5 35.Qc4 Qxc4 36.Rxc4 Bxe5 37.Kf1

Teimour Radjabov

____r__k
_____p_p
p_____p_
____b___
__R_____
______PP
_____P__
____RK__

Vladimir Kramnik

Position after 37.Kf1

White has won the exchange with a completely winning position.

1-0

Ivanchuk-Gelfand

Boris Gelfand

Boris Gelfand. Photo © Ray Morris-Hill http://raymorris-hill.smugmug.com/.

Ivanchuk,Vassily (2757) - Gelfand,Boris (2740) [D93]
FIDE Candidates London ENG (11.2), 28.03.2013

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Nf3 Bg7 5.Bf4 0-0 6.e3 c5 7.dxc5 Ne4 8.Rc1 Nd7 9.cxd5 Qa5 10.Nd4 Nxc3 11.bxc3 Qxa2 12.c6

[12.Qb3 Qxb3 13.Nxb3 a5 14.c6 Nf6 15.d6 bxc6 16.dxe7 Re8 17.Nd4 Bd7 18.Bd6 Ne4 19.Ba3 c5 20.Bd3 Rxe7 21.Bxe4 Rxe4 22.Bxc5 Rc8 23.Ba3 f5 24.g3 g5 25.Kd2 Rce8 26.Rhe1 f4 27.exf4 Rxe1 28.Rxe1 Rxe1 29.Kxe1 gxf4 30.Kd2 Kf7 31.Kd3 fxg3 32.hxg3 h5 33.f4 Bf6 34.Kc4 h4 35.gxh4 Bxh4 36.Nf3 Bf6 37.Ne5+ Bxe5 38.fxe5 Ke6 39.Bd6 1/2-1/2 Fridman,D (2655)-Kramnik,V (2799)/Dortmund GER 2012/The Week in Chess 924]

12...Nc5 13.Be2

[13.c4 Ne4 14.Qc2 Qa5+ 15.Ke2 Nc5 16.cxb7 Bxb7 17.f3 e5 18.dxe6 Nxe6 19.Nxe6 fxe6 20.Bd6 Rfd8 21.c5 Rac8 22.Rd1 Bd5 23.Rxd5 exd5 24.Qb3 Kh8 25.Qxd5 Qc3 26.Kf2 Re8 27.Qd3 Qc1 28.g3 a5 29.h4 Be5 30.Bh3 Qxh1 31.Bxc8 Qh2+ 32.Kf1 Qxg3 33.Bg4 Qxh4 34.Bxe5+ Rxe5 35.c6 Qh1+ 36.Kf2 Qh2+ 37.Kf1 Qh1+ 38.Kf2 Qh2+ 39.Kf1 Qb2 40.Qd4 Qb5+ 41.Kf2 Qc5 42.f4 Kg8 43.Qxe5 Qxc6 44.Be6+ 1-0 Somogyi,I (2290)-Kun,S (2295)/Hungary 1992/EXT 2000]

13...Qxd5 14.Bf3 Qc4 15.Be2 Qd5 16.Bf3 Qc4 17.Be2 Qd5

It is equal and the players don't have a lot to play for.

Boris Gelfand

r_b__rk_
pp__ppbp
__P___p_
__nq____
___N_B__
__P_P___
____BPPP
__RQK__R

Vassily Ivanchuk

Position after 17...Qd5

1/2-1/2

FIDE Candidates London (ENG), 15 iii-1 iv 2013 cat. XXII (2787)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1. Carlsen, Magnus g NOR 2872 * * ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 . 1 ½ 1 1 ½ . ½ . 2909
2. Kramnik, Vladimir g RUS 2810 ½ ½ * * ½ . ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ . ½ . ½ 1 7 2889
3. Aronian, Levon g ARM 2809 ½ ½ ½ . * * ½ 0 ½ . 1 0 1 1 1 . 2846
4. Svidler, Peter g RUS 2747 0 . ½ 0 ½ 1 * * ½ ½ ½ . ½ . 1 ½ 2792
5. Grischuk, Alexander g RUS 2764 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ . ½ ½ * * ½ . ½ 1 ½ . 5 2756
6. Gelfand, Boris g ISR 2740 0 0 ½ . 0 1 ½ . ½ . * * ½ ½ ½ 1 5 2762
7. Ivanchuk, Vassily g UKR 2757 ½ . ½ . 0 0 ½ . ½ 0 ½ ½ * * 0 1 4 2683
8. Radjabov, Teimour g AZE 2793 ½ . ½ 0 0 . 0 ½ ½ . ½ 0 1 0 * * 2644
Round 11 (March 28, 2013)
Kramnik, Vladimir - Radjabov, Teimour 1-0 37 E60 King's Indian without Nc3
Svidler, Peter - Aronian, Levon 1-0 41 E26 Nimzo Indian Saemisch
Grischuk, Alexander - Carlsen, Magnus ½-½ 23 D90 Gruenfeld Flohr
Ivanchuk, Vassily - Gelfand, Boris ½-½ 17 D93 Gruenfeld 5.Bf4

View the games on this Page

Download the PGN from this page

vs

Shereshevsky Method


Chess and Bridge Shop


Chess.com Titled Tuesday


ChessBase Ad 6 Live DB


American Chess Magazine 4


Ginger GM - Chess Grandmaster Simon Williams


Contact Mark Crowther (TWIC) if you wish to advertise here.


The Week in Chess Magazine

Send a £30 donation via Paypal and contact me via email (Email Mark Crowther - mdcrowth@btinternet.com) I'll send you an address for a cbv file of my personal copy of every issue of the games in one database. Over 2 million games.

Read about 20 years of TWIC.

Read about issue 1200.

TWIC 1211 22nd January 2018 - 2165 games

Read TWIC 1211

Download TWIC 1211 PGN

Download TWIC 1211 ChessBase


.