Chess24 Sopiko Scotch

Corus Wijk aan Zee 2010 (3)

Black day for the underdog

Alexei Shirov leads on 3/3. Photo © Michiel Abel n

Alexei Shirov leads on 3/3. Photo © Michiel Abel n | http://chess.co.uk/twic

Today most of the favourites had black and they tujrned up with 4 wins. Alexei Shirov moved to 3/3 by beating Sergei Tiviakov with black. There were also wins for Carlsen, Ivanchuk and Nakamura.

None of the players in the A-Group of the Wijk aan Zee tournament are anything close to being weak. It is therefore very instructive to see how very good players are beaten by even better ones, sometimes in a manner that is almost mysterious. Today in 6 of the 7 games black outrated white and in 4 of them black managed to win.

Alexei Shirov's hot form continued with another win, this time against Sergei Tiviakov. Tiviakov played 3.Bb5 against the Sicilian which can have drawish tendencies. He got sacrificed a pawn in a known line but started to introduce new problems with 14...Rg8 which seems to be new. White's position was already the harder to play and after 24...Qh6? Shirov brought home the full point very quickly. He is now the only player in any of the top 3 groups who has a 100% score.

Tiviakov,S (2662) - Shirov,A (2723) [B23]
Corus A Wijk aan Zee NED (3), 18.01.2010
[Mark Crowther]

1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nd4

There are very few lines that make Bb5 look interesting.

4.Bc4 e6 5.Nge2 Nf6 6.0-0 a6 7.d3 b5 8.Bb3 Nxb3 9.axb3 Bb7 10.f4 d5 11.e5 d4 12.exf6 dxc3 13.fxg7 Bxg7

Black has got the mess he needs against Tiviakov although he was still in preparation here.

14.bxc3 Rg8

[14...Qd7 15.f5 Qc6 16.Nf4 Bxc3 17.fxe6 0-0-0 18.exf7 Bxa1 19.Qg4+ Qd7 20.Ne6 Bd4+ 21.Kh1 Bd5 22.Re1 Rhf8 23.c4 Bxe6 24.Rxe6 Rxf7 0-1 Jotic,V (2277)-Ermenkov,E (2460)/Subotica YUG 2002/The Week in Chess 387]

15.Rf2 Bxc3 16.Nxc3 Qd4 17.Kf1 Qxc3 18.Ra2

Alexei Shirov

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Sergei Tiviakov

Position after 18.Ra2. Black already looks better here but Shirov thought that he was still battling for equality if his attack failed.

18...Qd4 19.Qh5 c4 20.bxc4 bxc4 21.Ra4

[21.Qe5 looks best.]

21...Bd5 22.f5 e5 23.Qxh7?

[23.Qh6 Kd7]

23....Kd7

Alexei Shirov

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Sergei Tiviakov

Position after 23...Kd7

24.Qh6?

I'm not sure what move works for white here. Black's pieces are perfect, white's less so but this move allows black a decisive breakthrough. White actually thought for a long time here, the trouble is obviously quite big.

[24.h3 Bxg2+ 25.Rxg2; 24.f6 with the idea of playing Qh3+ is surely better.]

24...Bxg2+ 25.Ke1 Bd5 26.Ba3

[26.Rf1 Rg1 is still losing.]

26...Rg1+ 27.Ke2 Qg4+ 28.Ke3 Re1+ 29.Kd2 Qd1+ 30.Kc3 Qa1+ 31.Kb4 Rb1+ 0-1

Magnus Carlsen chose the Queen's Gambit Declined against Loek van Wely and ended up with a bishop against knight in a double rook ending. It's hard to put my finger precisely where Van Wely went wrong but he was gradually outplayed. Maybe 26.Re1 may have stopped some problems, 35.Rd7 was probably the final error but it looked pretty smooth by Carlsen in a position where there didn't seem too many problems. A lesson to us all perhaps.

Van Wely,L (2641) - Carlsen,M (2810) [D36]
Corus A Wijk aan Zee NED (3), 18.01.2010
[Mark Crowther]

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 d5 4.d4 Nbd7 5.cxd5 exd5 6.Bg5 Be7 7.e3 c6 8.Qc2 0-0 9.Bd3 Re8 10.h3 Ne4 11.Bxe4 dxe4 12.Nxe4 Qa5+ 13.Kf1 Bf8

[13...Nf8 14.Bxe7 Rxe7 15.Kg1 Qf5 16.Nfd2 Qg6 17.Kh2 Bf5 18.f3 Rae8 19.Rac1 h5 20.Rhe1 h4 21.Qc5 Rd7 22.Kh1 a6 23.Qb4 Ne6 24.Nd6 Nf4 25.exf4 Rxe1+ 26.Rxe1 Qxd6 27.Qxd6 Rxd6 1/2-1/2 Vybiral,Z (2206)-Vevera,R (1966)/Klatovy CZE 2005/The Week in Chess 559]

14.Bf4

[14.Nc3 Nb6 15.Bf4 Bf5 16.e4 Bxe4 17.Nxe4 Qf5 18.Nfg5 Kh8 19.Nf6 1-0 Khenkin,I (2609)-Glaser,S (1946)/Bad Homburg 2008/CBM 124 Extra]

14...Qf5 15.Nfd2 Nb6 16.Rc1 Nd5 17.g4 Qg6 18.Nd6 Rd8 19.Qxg6 hxg6 20.Nxc8 Nxf4 21.exf4 Rxd4!

Perhaps giving black a tiny advantage. This zwischenzug is the most accurate.

22.Nb3 Rb4 23.Kg2 Rxc8 24.Rhd1 Rxf4 25.Rd7 Rb4

Magnus Carlsen

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Loek Van Wely

Position after 25...Rb4

26.Rc2

[26.Re1 keeping black's remaining rook boxed in looks better.]

26...Re8 27.Rcd2 Be7 28.Rc7 Bf6 29.Rdd7 b6 30.Rxa7 g5 31.Rd2 c5 32.Ra6 c4 33.Nd4 Bxd4 34.Rxd4 Rxb2 35.Rd7

[35.Rxc4 Ree2 36.Kg3 Rxf2 37.Rxb6 Rxa2 38.Rc7 Rg2+ 39.Kf3 Rh2 40.Ke4 Rxh3 41.Rb8+ Kh7 42.Rxf7 Re2+ 43.Kd5 Rd2+ 44.Kc4 Rg3 45.Rbb7 Rxg4+ 46.Kc3 Rgd4 47.Rxg7+]

35...c3 36.Raa7 Rf8 37.Rdc7 c2 38.Kg3 Rd8 39.Rxf7

There wasn't a lot black could do but this loses immediately.

39...Rd3+ 40.Kg2 c1Q 0-1

Nigel Short played some very impressive chess last year. However he struggled in the London Chess Classic and is already in the basement here. Short was famous for his battles against the Sicilian but these days he also tries to avoid mainsteam theory. This approach led to very anaemic play from him today against Hikaru Nakamura, Short would have been better going down in flames trying to play his own style rather than this. Already after 18 moves black's position gave the impression of being more co-ordinated and plans for white looked thin on the ground. After 24 moves he looked in bad trouble and after 25 it was all she wrote. Nakamura was very clean in finishing things off.

Short,N (2696) - Nakamura,Hi (2708) [B58]
Corus A Wijk aan Zee NED (3), 18.01.2010
[Mark Crowther]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Be2 e5 7.Nf3 h6 8.0-0 Be6 9.b3

[9.Nd2 Be7 10.Bc4 0-0 11.Nd5 Bxd5 12.Bxd5 Nxd5 13.exd5 Nb4 14.Ne4 f5 15.Ng3 a5 16.a3 Na6 17.c4 Nc5 18.Bd2 f4 19.Ne2 f3 20.gxf3 Rxf3 21.Ng3 Qf8 22.Be3 Nd7 23.b4 axb4 24.axb4 Rxa1 25.Qxa1 Qc8 26.Qc1 Nf6 27.Qd1 e4 28.Qe2 Qh3 0-1 Wang Shuo (2411)-Bu Xiangzhi (2465)/Qingdao CHN 1999]

9...a6

[9...Be7 10.Bb2 (10.h3 Rc8 11.Bb2 0-0 12.Qd2 a6 13.Rfd1 b5 14.Qe3 Qc7 15.Rd2 Rfd8 16.Rad1 Nb4 17.a3 Nc6 18.Bf1 Bf8 19.Ne1 Nd4 20.Nf3 Nc6 21.a4 bxa4 22.Nxa4 Nb4 23.c4 Rb8 24.Ba3 Nc6 25.Rc1 Qb7 26.Rb2 Ne7 27.Nd2 Ng6 28.c5 Qc6 29.Bc4 d5 30.exd5 Bxd5 31.f3 Re8 32.Nc3 Nf4 33.Nce4 Bxc4 34.Nxf6+ Qxf6 35.Nxc4 Qg6 36.Rd1 Nxh3+ 37.Kf1 Nf4 38.Nd6 Re6 39.Rbd2 Rd8 40.Qf2 f5 41.c6 Bxd6 42.c7 Bxc7 43.Rxd8+ Bxd8 44.Rxd8+ Kh7 45.Rd7 Rc6 46.Bb2 Qe6 47.Qd2 Rc5 48.Rb7 Rd5 49.Qxf4 Qc8 50.Bxe5 Qxb7 51.Qxf5+ Kg8 52.Qe6+ Qf7 53.Qc8+ Kh7 54.f4 Rxe5 0-1 Danojevic,Z-Elez,S (2173)/Banja Luka 2004/CBM 103 ext) 10...0-0 11.Re1 Re8 12.h3 a6 13.a4 Rc8 14.Bf1 Qa5 15.Na2 Qb6 16.c4 a5 17.Nc3 Nd7 18.Bc1 Nc5 19.Rb1 Nb4 20.Be3 Red8 21.Rb2 Rd7 22.Qb1 Qd8 23.Rd1 Qf8 24.Rbd2 f5 25.Ne1 fxe4 26.Bxc5 Rxc5 27.Qxe4 Bf5 28.Qf3 Bg5 29.Rb2 Nc6 30.g3 Nd4 31.Qg2 Rf7 32.Bd3 Qc8 33.Bxf5 Qxf5 34.Ne4 Rc6 35.Kh1 Bd8 36.Rbb1 Bb6 37.Rd3 Qe6 38.Rbd1 d5 39.cxd5 Qxd5 40.Nf6+ 1-0 Manakov,I (2279)-Kotov,V (2127)/St Petersburg RUS 2000]

10.Re1 Rc8 11.Bb2 Be7 12.Bf1 0-0 13.Nd5 Bg4 14.c4 Nxd5 15.exd5 Nb8 16.h3 Bh5 17.Be2 Nd7 18.Rc1 Bg6 19.b4?!

This rather cautious setup from white already doesn't look very co-ordinated. This plan completely backfires however.

[19.Bd3 f5 20.Bc2 Bh5 21.Qd3 e4 22.Qc3 Bf6 23.Nd4 looks ugly too.]

19...e4 20.Nd2

[20.Nd4 Bg5 21.Rc3 Ne5 22.a3 Nd3 23.Bxd3 exd3]

20...Qb6 21.a3 Bh4!

Hikaru Nakamura

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Nigel Short

Position after 21...Bh4!

Looks pretty difficult to deal with.

22.c5 dxc5 23.Nc4 Qd8 24.Bh5

[24.g3 Bg5 25.Rc2 cxb4 26.axb4 isn't much better.; 24.Qd2 b5 25.Nd6 Rc7 26.Rcd1 Qe7 27.Nxe4 Qxe4 is maybe a better sort of idea.]

24...cxb4 25.Bxg6 fxg6

Already Short is lost.

26.Rxe4 Bxf2+ 27.Kh1 b5 28.Ne5 Rxc1 29.Bxc1 Nxe5 30.Rxe5 Bg3 31.Re3 Bf4 32.Rd3 Bd6 33.axb4 Qf6 34.Be3 Qf1+ 35.Bg1 Rf4 36.g4 Qxd1 37.Rxd1 Rxb4 38.Re1 Rf4 39.Ra1 Ra4 40.Re1 b4 41.Re6 b3!

Black is winning but this is the most direct.

42.Rxd6 Rb4 43.Rd8+ Kh7 0-1

Like Shirov, Vassily Ivanchuk has not always been at his best at Wijk aan Zee. When he is at his best he is pretty unplayable. Today he beat Jan Smeets very smoothly. I would tell you where Smeets went wrong, if I knew, but I have absolutely no clue. Black got his pieces where he wanted and broke through on the run up to first time control where apparently Smeets was in time trouble.

Smeets,J (2657) - Ivanchuk,V (2749) [B96]
Corus A Wijk aan Zee NED (3), 18.01.2010
[Mark Crowther]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bg5 e6 7.f4 Qc7 8.Qf3 b5 9.Bxf6 gxf6 10.a3 Bb7 11.Be2 h5 12.0-0-0

[12.Qh3 h4 13.0-0-0 Nd7 14.Kb1 0-0-0 15.f5 e5 16.Ne6 fxe6 17.fxe6 Kb8 18.exd7 Qxd7 19.Bg4 Qc7 20.Rhf1 Be7 21.Be6 Rh5 22.Rf3 Rg5 23.Nd5 Bxd5 24.Bxd5 Qc8 25.Be6 Qc5 26.Rb3 Rg7 27.a4 Bf8 28.Qd3 b4 29.c3 a5 30.cxb4 axb4 31.Rc1 Qa5 32.Bd5 Rc8 33.Rc4 Rxc4 34.Qxc4 Qc5 35.Rxb4+ Ka7 36.Qb3 1-0 Bracker,F (2253)-Parligras,M (2561)/Hamburg GER 2008/The Week in Chess 706]

12...Nd7 13.f5 e5 14.Nb3 Rc8 15.Kb1 Nb6 16.Rd3 Bh6 17.Qxh5 Ke7 18.Qf3 Nc4 19.Rhd1 Bg5 20.h3 Rh4 21.Qf2 Qb8 22.Bg4 a5 23.Qe2 Rhh8 24.Qe1 Rhd8 25.Nd5+

[25.Na1 maybe]

25...Bxd5 26.Rxd5 Qc7 27.Qe2 a4 28.Na1 b4 29.axb4 a3 30.Nb3

[30.R1d3 axb2 31.Nb3 Na3+ 32.Kxb2 Nxc2 33.Rb5 Isn't all that either.]

30...Nxb2 31.Ra5 Ra8 32.Ka2

Vassily Ivanchuk

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Jan Smeets

Position after 32.Ka2. Where did it all go wrong?

I'm not quite sure what Smeets should do here but this loses faster than neutral moves.

32...Nxd1 33.Qxd1 Qc3 34.Qa1 Qxc2+ 35.Kxa3 Rxa5+ 36.bxa5 Rb8 0-1

World Champion Viswanathan Anand, whilst not exactly in trouble, had to defend a Ruy Lopez a pawn down against Leinier Dominguez Perez, he had to do this for 77 moves but was never close to losing.

Dominguez Perez,L (2712) - Anand,V (2790) [C78]
Corus A Wijk aan Zee NED (3), 18.01.2010
[Mark Crowther]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 b5 6.Bb3 Bc5 7.a4 Rb8 8.c3 d6 9.d4 Bb6 10.axb5 axb5 11.Qd3 Bd7 12.Na3 0-0 13.Nxb5

[13.Bg5 h6 14.Bh4 g5 15.Nxg5 hxg5 16.Bxg5 exd4 17.Rae1 Kg7 18.f4 Be6 19.Kh1 Rh8 20.h3 Qd7 21.e5 Nh5 22.f5 Bxf5 23.Bf6+ Kf8 24.Rxf5 Qxf5 25.Qxf5 Ng3+ 26.Kh2 Nxf5 27.Bxh8 dxe5 28.Nxb5 Nd6 29.Ba4 Nc4 30.Na3 N6a5 31.Nxc4 Nxc4 32.b3 Ne3 33.cxd4 exd4 34.Bf6 Ba5 35.Re2 c5 36.Bg5 Bc7+ 37.g3 Nf1+ 38.Kg2 Nxg3 39.Re7 Bd6 40.Rd7 Nf5 41.Kf3 Be7 42.Bf4 Rb6 43.Rc7 Re6 44.Bd7 Nh4+ 45.Kg4 Re4 46.Rc8+ Kg7 47.Bc6 f5+ 48.Kg3 Re1 49.Kf2 Re6 50.Bd5 Ra6 51.Be5+ Bf6 52.Rc7+ Kg6 53.Bf4 Bg5 54.Be5 d3 55.Bf7+ Kh6 56.Bg7+ Kh7 57.Bc4 Ra2+ 58.Kf1 Kg6 59.Bxd3 Be3 1/2-1/2 Shabalov,A (2593)-Friedel,J (2425)/Minneapolis USA 2005/The Week in Chess 550]

13...exd4

[13...Qe8 14.Re1 Na5 15.Ba4 d5 16.Nxe5 dxe4 17.Qe2 Bxb5 18.Bxb5 c6 19.Ba4 Qe6 20.Bf4 Rfc8 21.b4 Nb7 22.Nxc6 Ra8 23.Qb5 1-0 Endress,A (2066)-Anker,C (1886)/Willingen 2009/CB43_2009]

14.cxd4 Ne5 15.dxe5 Bxb5 16.Bc4 Bxc4 17.Qxc4 dxe5 18.Nxe5 Qd6 19.Nd3 Rfd8 20.Ra3 Qd4 21.Qxd4 Rxd4 22.e5 Nd5 23.g3 h6 24.Re1 Nb4 25.Nxb4 Rxb4 26.Rc3

White has an extra pawn but how much it's worth in this simplified and pretty well known sort of structure is open to question.

26...Rb7 27.Rc6 Bd4 28.e6 fxe6 29.Rexe6 Kf7 30.Re2 Bxb2 31.Bf4 R4b6 32.Rxc7+ Rxc7 33.Bxc7

Good technique is all that is required by black to hold this. But as we've already seen in this event some players don't have it.

33...Rb7 34.Bf4 Bf6 35.Kg2 h5 36.Rc2 g6 37.Be3 Rd7 38.Rc4 Be5 39.h3 Bg7 40.f4 Bf6 41.Kf3 Bg7 42.Rb4 Bf6 43.Ke4 Re7+ 44.Kd3 Rd7+ 45.Ke4 Re7+ 46.Kf3 Rd7 47.Rb5 Rc7 48.Rd5 Ke6 49.Ra5 Kf7 50.Ra6 Re7 51.g4 hxg4+ 52.hxg4 Re6 53.Ra5 Re7 54.Rb5 Bg7 55.Bc5 Rd7 56.Ke4 Rd1 57.Rb7+ Kg8 58.Be3 Rd8 59.Bc5 Rd1 60.g5 Re1+ 61.Kd5 Rd1+ 62.Kc6 Rc1 63.Kd5 Rd1+ 64.Ke4 Re1+ 65.Kd3 Rd1+ 66.Ke2 Rd5 67.Ba7 Ra5 68.Kf3 Ra3+ 69.Kg4 Ra4 70.Bb8 Ra3 71.Be5 Bxe5 72.fxe5 Re3 73.Kf4 Re1 74.Ra7 Kf8 75.Ra3 Kf7 76.Re3 Ra1 77.Rf3

There is no prospect of progress for white.

1/2-1/2

I get why people play the Petroff. If white has any ambitions to win he has to avoid exchanges and this generally gives black at least equal play and results show this. What I don't get is why a player rated 113 points more than his opponent would play it. Fabiano Caruana faced Vladimir Kramnik's Petroff Defence and they pretty much could have called the whole thing off after 12 moves.

Caruana,F (2675) - Kramnik,V (2788) [C42]
Corus A Wijk aan Zee NED (3), 18.01.2010
[Mark Crowther]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nf3 Nxe4 5.Nc3 Nxc3 6.dxc3 Be7 7.Be3 0-0 8.Qd2 Nd7 9.0-0-0 Re8 10.h4 c6 11.Bd3

[11.c4 Nc5 12.Bd3 Nxd3+ 13.Qxd3 Qa5 14.Bd2 Qf5 15.Bb4 Qxd3 16.cxd3 Bg4 17.Rde1 Bxf3 18.gxf3 Bf8 19.Bc3 h5 20.f4 f5 21.Re3 Kf7 22.Kd2 Rad8 23.Ke2 d5 24.cxd5 Rxd5 25.Rg1 Red8 26.Be5 g6 27.d4 Be7 28.Reg3 Rg8 29.Rf1 Rd7 30.Rc3 Bd8 31.Kd3 Ba5 32.Rc2 Bb6 33.Kc4 Rgd8 34.Rd2 Rd5 35.Rd3 c5 36.Rfd1 cxd4 37.Bxd4 Bc7 38.Bxa7 Rxd3 39.Rxd3 Rxd3 40.Kxd3 Bd8 41.a4 Bxh4 42.b4 Bd8 43.Bd4 Ke6 44.f3 h4 45.Ke2 Kd5 46.Be3 Kc4 47.Bd2 Kb3 48.a5 Ka4 49.Kf2 Be7 0-1 Korbut,E (2443)-Lahno,K (2459)/Kemer TUR 2007/The Week in Chess 674]

11...Qa5 12.Kb1

Vladimir Kramnik

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Fabio Caruana

Position after 12.Kb1

Black is fine, white is fine, lets shake hands and go home the Petroff way.

12...Ne5 13.Nxe5 dxe5 14.Qe2 Be6 15.Bc4 Bxc4 16.Qxc4 Rad8 17.h5 Rxd1+ 18.Rxd1 Rd8 19.Rd3 a6 20.Qg4 Qc7 21.Qe4 g6 22.g4 Rxd3 23.cxd3 Qd7 24.Qxe5 Qxd3+ 25.Kc1 Qd6 26.Qe4 Qe6 27.Qxe6 fxe6 28.Kc2 gxh5 29.gxh5 e5 30.Kd3 Kf7 31.Ke4 1/2-1/2

Peter Leko against Sergey Karjain was a nominally risky variation of the Queen's Indian where white sacrifices a pawn. However black returned and then sacrificed a pawn for development and a sterile position quickly resulted.

Leko,P (2739) - Karjakin,Sergey (2720) [E15]
Corus A Wijk aan Zee NED (3), 18.01.2010
[Mark Crowther]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.g3 Ba6 5.Qc2 Bb7 6.Bg2 c5 7.d5 exd5 8.cxd5 Nxd5 9.0-0 Be7 10.Rd1 Nc6 11.Qa4 Nf6 12.Nh4 0-0

[12...g6 13.Bh6 Bf8 14.Bxf8 Kxf8 15.Nc3 Kg7 16.Qf4 Re8 17.Nb5 d5 18.Nd6 Re5 19.Nxb7 Qe7 20.Nxc5 bxc5 21.Qa4 Re6 22.e3 Rb8 23.Qa3 d4 24.Bxc6 Rxc6 25.exd4 Qe2 26.Rab1 cxd4 27.Qxa7 Rxb2 28.Qxd4 Rxb1 29.Rxb1 Qxa2 1/2-1/2 Aronian,L (2768)-Karjakin,S (2717)/Jermuk ARM 2009/The Week in Chess 771; 12...Qc8 13.Nf5 Nd4 14.Bxb7 Qxb7 15.Nxd4 cxd4 16.Rxd4 Bc5 17.Rd3 b5 18.Qf4 0-0 19.b4 Be7 20.Bb2 a5 21.bxa5 Rxa5 22.Nd2 Qa6 23.Ne4 Nxe4 24.Qxe4 Bf6 25.Bxf6 1/2-1/2 Nyback,T (2615)-Bacrot,E (2709)/Ohrid 2009/CB42_2009]

13.Nf5 d5 14.Nc3 Nd4 15.Nxd4 cxd4 16.Qxd4 Bc5 17.Qa4 Qc8 18.Nxd5 Nxd5 19.Bxd5 Bxd5 20.Rxd5 Qe6 21.e4 Rfe8 22.Bf4 Qxe4 23.Qxe4 Rxe4 24.Rad1 Rae8

It's only a matter of time before the point is split.

25.Kf1 f6 26.h4 Kf7 27.a3 a5 28.Bd6 Bxd6 29.Rxd6 R8e6 30.Rd7+ Re7 31.R1d6 Rxd7 32.Rxd7+ Re7 33.Rd8 Re5 34.Rd7+ Re7 35.Rd6 Re6 36.Rd7+ 1/2-1/2

Sergey Karjakin

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Peter Leko

Final Position after 36.Rd7+

Corus A Wijk aan Zee (NED), 16-31 i 2010 cat. XIX (2719)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4
1. Shirov, Alexei g ESP 2723 * . . . . . . . 1 1 1 . . . 3
2. Carlsen, Magnus g NOR 2810 . * . . . . . . ½ . . 1 1 . 2926
3. Nakamura, Hikaru g USA 2708 . . * . . . . . . . . 1 ½ 1 2937
4. Ivanchuk, Vassily g UKR 2749 . . . * . . . . ½ ½ . . 1 . 2 2789
5. Dominguez Perez, Leinier g CUB 2712 . . . . * ½ ½ ½ . . . . . . 2766
6. Karjakin, Sergey g UKR 2720 . . . . ½ * ½ . . . ½ . . . 2747
7. Anand, Viswanathan g IND 2790 . . . . ½ ½ * . . . . . . ½ 2709
8. Kramnik, Vladimir g RUS 2788 . . . . ½ . . * . ½ ½ . . . 2708
9. Tiviakov, Sergei g NED 2662 0 ½ . ½ . . . . * . . . . . 1 2635
10. Caruana, Fabiano g ITA 2675 0 . . ½ . . . ½ . * . . . . 1 2628
11. Leko, Peter g HUN 2739 0 . . . . ½ . ½ . . * . . . 1 2618
12. Van Wely, Loek g NED 2641 . 0 0 . . . . . . . . * . 1 1 2613
13. Smeets, Jan g NED 2657 . 0 ½ 0 . . . . . . . . * . ½ 2482
14. Short, Nigel D g ENG 2696 . . 0 . . . ½ . . . . 0 . * ½ 2440
Round 3 (January 18, 2010)
Dominguez Perez, Leinier - Anand, Viswanathan ½-½ 77 C78 Ruy Lopez Moeller Defence
Tiviakov, Sergei - Shirov, Alexei 0-1 31 B23 Sicilian Closed
Caruana, Fabiano - Kramnik, Vladimir ½-½ 31 C42 Petroff's Defence
Leko, Peter - Karjakin, Sergey ½-½ 36 E15 Queens Indian
Van Wely, Loek - Carlsen, Magnus 0-1 40 D37 QGD 5.Bf4
Smeets, Jan - Ivanchuk, Vassily 0-1 36 B96 Sicilian Najdorf
Short, Nigel D - Nakamura, Hikaru 0-1 43 B58 Sicilian Boleslavsky
Corus B Wijk aan Zee (NED), 16-31 i 2010 cat. XVI (2629)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4
1. Giri, Anish g NED 2588 * . . . . . . 1 1 . . . . ½ 2915
2. Ni Hua g CHN 2657 . * . ½ . . . . . 1 . . 1 . 2911
3. Naiditsch, Arkadij g GER 2687 . . * . . ½ ½ . . . 1 . . . 2 2760
4. L'Ami, Erwin g NED 2615 . ½ . * . . ½ . . ½ . . . . 2656
5. Howell, David W L g ENG 2606 . . . . * ½ . ½ ½ . . . . . 2658
6. Negi, Parimarjan g IND 2621 . . ½ . ½ * . . . . . ½ . . 2605
7. So, Wesley g PHI 2656 . . ½ ½ . . * . . . ½ . . . 2643
8. Harikrishna, P g IND 2672 0 . . . ½ . . * . . . 1 . . 2572
9. Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter g ROU 2681 0 . . . ½ . . . * . . . 1 . 2612
10. Sutovsky, Emil g ISR 2657 . 0 . ½ . . . . . * . . . 1 2615
11. Akobian, Varuzhan g USA 2628 . . 0 . . . ½ . . . * ½ . . 1 2497
12. Muzychuk, Anna m SLO 2523 . . . . . ½ . 0 . . ½ * . . 1 2515
13. Nyback, Tomi g FIN 2643 . 0 . . . . . . 0 . . . * 1 1 2512
14. Reinderman, Dimitri g NED 2573 ½ . . . . . . . . 0 . . 0 * ½ 2356
Round 3 (January 18, 2010)
Giri, Anish - Reinderman, Dimitri ½-½ 31 A90 Dutch Classical
Naiditsch, Arkadij - Negi, Parimarjan ½-½ 39 B96 Sicilian Najdorf
Howell, David W L - Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter ½-½ 23 B40 Sicilian Classical
So, Wesley - Akobian, Varuzhan ½-½ 33 D34 Tarrasch Defence, Main Line
Sutovsky, Emil - L'Ami, Erwin ½-½ 24 C12 French MacCutcheon
Muzychuk, Anna - Harikrishna, P 0-1 89 B17 Caro Kann
Nyback, Tomi - Ni Hua 0-1 38 D86 Gruenfeld Simagin
Corus C Wijk aan Zee (NED), 16-31 i 2010 cat. IX (2455)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4
1. Vocaturo, Daniele g ITA 2495 * . ½ . . . . . . . 1 . 1 . 2719
2. Robson, Ray g USA 2570 . * . . . . . 1 . ½ . . . 1 2694
3. Li Chao2 g CHN 2604 ½ . * . . . . . . . . 1 1 . 2638
4. Gupta, Abhijeet g IND 2577 . . . * . 1 . ½ . ½ . . . . 2 2552
5. Peng Zhaoqin g NED 2402 . . . . * . ½ . 1 . ½ . . . 2 2631
6. Kuipers, Stefan f NED 2340 . . . 0 . * 1 . ½ . . . . . 2546
7. Grandelius, Nils m SWE 2515 . . . . ½ 0 * . . 1 . . . . 2396
8. Swinkels, Robin m NED 2495 . 0 . ½ . . . * . . . . . 1 2490
9. Lie, Kjetil A g NOR 2547 . . . . 0 ½ . . * . . 1 . . 2354
10. Muzychuk, Mariya m UKR 2447 . ½ . ½ . . 0 . . * . . . . 1 2429
11. Van Kampen, Robin m NED 2456 0 . . . ½ . . . . . * ½ . . 1 2281
12. Bok, Benjamin f NED 2322 . . 0 . . . . . 0 . ½ * . . ½ 2262
13. Plukkel, Sjoerd NED 2279 0 . 0 . . . . . . . . . * ½ ½ 2201
14. Soumya, Swaminathan wg IND 2323 . 0 . . . . . 0 . . . . ½ * ½ 2175
Round 3 (January 18, 2010)
Vocaturo, Daniele - Van Kampen, Robin 1-0 23 B94 Sicilian Najdorf with 6.Bg5
Peng Zhaoqin - Grandelius, Nils ½-½ 29 E32 Nimzo Indian 4.Qc2
Kuipers, Stefan - Gupta, Abhijeet 0-1 40 B67 Sicilian Rauzer
Swinkels, Robin - Soumya, Swaminathan 1-0 29 A20 English Opening
Muzychuk, Mariya - Robson, Ray ½-½ 30 E35 Nimzo Indian 4.Qc2
Bok, Benjamin - Lie, Kjetil A 0-1 55 B38 Sicilian Maroczy Bind
Plukkel, Sjoerd - Li Chao2 0-1 27 B50 Sicilian Defence

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